Agency for Change- Angelica Stevenson, Writer, Angelic Expressive Connections » KidGlov

Announcer:

Welcome to Agency for Change, the podcast that brings you the stories of people creating positive change in the world. We explore what inspires these changemakers, the work they’re doing and how they share their message. Each of us can play a part in change. And these are the people who show us how.

Lyn Wineman:

Hello, changemakers. This is Lyn Wineman, President and Chief Strategist of KidGlo‪v. And welcome to another episode of the Agency for Change Podcast. Now, today’s guest, Angelica Stevenson, discovered a special talent for connecting with people at a young age. And today she uses that talent to help people walk in their soul’s purpose to accomplish their dreams and goals. That sounds amazing to me. And I think it sounds like a noble calling. I can’t wait to talk with her. Angelica, how are you today?

Angelica Stevenson:

Hi, queen, thank you Lyn. Hi kings and queens, all you guys listening. Thank you for having me. It is an honor and pleasure to be on your podcast. You guys are an amazing organization, I love what you guys do.

Lyn Wineman:

I just love your energy to start with, anybody who starts by calling me a queen, how fabulous does that make someone feel. Now, Angelica, you shared with me that you’ve been a street counselor since about the sixth grade. So first of all, that’s a really young age and second of all, I’m not quite sure, I think I know what a street counselor is, but I’m not sure. And then it started after you were introduced to poetry and you say it was love at first write. There’s a lot packed in there. Can you tell me more about all of that?

Angelica Stevenson:

Yes. I would love to. Sixth grade, 14 years young, I was going down a self-destructive path. And though I was raised in the church, my dad’s a preacher, I didn’t feel like I was living up to my potential, and I was wondering where God was at in my life, and what to do with my life. So in the sixth grade, my English teacher, his name is Mr Hart.

Lyn Wineman:

Got to remember those great teachers. And what a coincidence that his name was Mr. Hart.

Angelica Stevenson:

Right, it hit where it was needed. He assigned us a poem called I am. So we all had to write an I am poem. Mine was, I am a girl who loves to sing. So when it was my turn to get up, I started out, I am a girl who loves to sing. I sometimes wonder if singing will help me through the day. After that, I went into a trance, I don’t know what happened, how long it took me. But when I finally came back to earth, people were just looking at me. My teacher was like, “That was a great poem.” And I was like, “Oh, I’m done? Oh, okay.” But I knew something happened. You go through these moments in life where you feel like you’ve been changed and something new has happened to you. And when I walked down the steps after school, I looked up at the sun, I knew in my heart, that poetry is my thing.

Angelica Stevenson:

And then I vowed right then and there, I would use my writings to help people and myself, no matter what I went through, whether good or bad. So when I would skip school, because I skipped school y’all, I did. I would hang out at the bus stop downtown and people would actually come up to me-

Lyn Wineman:

Is your mother listening right now? Should we tell her that you skipped school?

Angelica Stevenson:

No, she knew about that. She knew. And people would come up to me, they would first be like, “Hey, are you this person? You look like my sister.” Mistaken identity. But then they would stay and linger and I felt like there was something more that they needed to say, they needed to get off their chest. And they would just start talking to me. And these would be grown adults talking to me. And first I would just listen, and then later I began to ask questions. I’d be like, “Are you okay? How do you feel about that? What do you want to do?” And then I learned to not listen to just the words, but their energy, their body language. So even though I was in the sixth grade, 14 years, I was helping people. I was listening. I was finding different angles to help them connect to different ways and people in life so that they can get their happiness to accomplish their goals and dreams. And it just kept getting better and I kept getting wiser at it as the years went on.

Lyn Wineman:

Angelica, that’s amazing. Because I think about myself at 14, I think I was probably very self-absorbed. And not looking for other people’s energy. And I probably was also very shy to speak with adults and people that I didn’t know, but I can tell, and the people who are listening can’t see you, but I can see you because we’re recording on Zoom right now. I can just tell even virtually that you have the kind of presence that makes you easy to talk to. So I can see how that would come, but I love that you are using your creativity and your skills with the written word. Now, talk to me a little bit more about how does that help you connect with people and their soul’s purpose?

Angelica Stevenson:

Great question. Well, poetry is something that everybody can relate to because it’s an art and not only connects to the ears, to the eyes, it connects with the inside. So with my poetry, I’d take from my own life experiences, what I’ve done personally, and then what I’ve seen as well. And then I am aware of my audience and the energy. I pay attention to the relationships that people have and I use it and see angles and connect it to them, by finding different ways to connect it to their own lives. Like something that anybody can relate to, anybody can relate to feeling like a caterpillar, but then they transition into a butterfly. And the angles I can use for that is your business. You have a caterpillar business and you want a butterfly business. If you’re a first-time parent you’re a caterpillar at first, and then you get to be a butterfly when you start having it be more. It’s all connected and that’s some things, I’m good, I’m good at seeing connections that you can relate to. So it becomes personal to you and encourages you to know that, hey.

Lyn Wineman:

That is so cool. Angelica, it’s amazing how there’s similarities between people. Because in my business of advertising, we try to do the same thing, except we’re doing it on behalf of organizations or companies. But we try to connect in different and interesting ways because nobody likes to just be told what to do or sent a list of bullet points. It’s, how do we make it funny or interesting or emotional so that it just really touches your heart? And I know counseling with people actually sounds way more noble than advertising, but I see the similarities there in the way creativity can be used to make a difference. Now, would you be willing to share any of your writing with us? It seems like I would be missing out if I didn’t ask you.

Angelica Stevenson:

Actually, yes. I actually wrote one on the way here, in five minutes, because the one I was doing, it was a past mindset and I didn’t want to keep sharing that mindset. So I wrote something new.

Lyn Wineman:

Wow, fresh. Is this the first time anyone’s heard it?

Angelica Stevenson:

Yes, it is.

Lyn Wineman:

All right. This is the world debut?

Angelica Stevenson:

Yes, it is. I am ready.

Lyn Wineman:

That’s me doing a drum roll. All right, here we go.

Angelica Stevenson:

All right.

See, I got a new baby coming and life’s Agency for Change is on standby, ready to go at my command, to be moved by my word, thoughts, feelings and actions. It’s about attraction and I’m ready to see, to feel, to experience my beauty from within.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh wow. That’s amazing. You do. You’ve got it. You have got a gift. That is cool. And I’m really honored that you would write that for this. That is really cool. So Angelica, the past year has been kind of tough. I don’t know. You seem like a positive person, but it’s been a rough year. The pandemic, economic concerns, social unrest. How did you use your writing to help you make it through?

Angelica Stevenson:

Great question. I used it to help one, parents, by writing out different… Actually, first I observed parents post on social media and because most parents, they’re not used to being with their children every single day.

Lyn Wineman:

It was a lot and trying to work and trying to just figure out what the heck is going on here.

Angelica Stevenson:

Exactly. So, I used that to find connections to them, to help them realize, “Hey, I know this is going to be something new and different and especially if you’re working, but here are new ideas.” I used my poetry and my program that I wrote, to help them connect to their children, not just on a parent-child level, because it has that sense of disconnect, but on a human to human level. To see them as a human person who also has their own thoughts and feelings and moods and emotions. And just like you would give an adult that same respect if they’re feeling upset or whatever, just back off a little bit, transfer that to your child. And then if you’re an entrepreneur or you have your own business, when it comes to certain things, treat your child like an employee.

Angelica Stevenson:

Like with my children, they have chores. And as an employee, when you have, I’m sorry, as an employer, when you have employees, you have to know their strengths and weaknesses.  Know your child’s strengths and weaknesses to delegate different chores. And those chores actually also turn out to be assignments, washing dishes is the home economics, helping to cook is math and science, yard work, that is, what is that? Architecture, landscaping-

Lyn Wineman:

Absolutely.

Angelica Stevenson:

And it also can lead to entrepreneurial work as well, growing up. So, I used my writings to help parents to see this and to connect and communicate with their children and for how to find some peace of mind during this time.

Lyn Wineman:

That is really good advice. Right? Good advice because you think about how we interact with coworkers, with clients, and think about treating your family the same way. I think when I grew up, my mother used to have a saying, it was, treat your friends like family and your family like friends. Meaning that get close to people, but also make sure that you’re extending your family members the same courtesies and patience and manners that you would have friends. I think as you get older, you learn that too. That mothers were fairly wise, even though we didn’t give them credit for it way back in the day, too. I think for people who may be struggling with their kids, that’s something to remember, that, hey, when they hit 23 they’ll appreciate you, just be patient until then. So Angelica, I know you help people with a variety of topics. We talked about parenting, but you also help them with making genuine connections and communicating with others. To big ones. I mean, overcoming addiction, self-improvement, self-empowerment, can you talk a bit more about your approach?

Angelica Stevenson:

Yes. My approach is, though we’re all different, we’re actually all the same. So when it comes to approaching somebody, I don’t see them just as somebody different. I see them as, hey, that is my reflection because we’re just getting back what’s reflecting from the inside out. And then I also have a firm knowing and belief in living universally, which means living as one to all. So it does go back to those sayings, treat others as you want to be treated. Do unto others as you want to be done unto you. But people are like, “Well, how do I do that? I have nothing in common with this person. I don’t think that I have gone through that exact same thing.” So what I teach people, especially in my program, it’s my secret, how I approach anybody and anything is how I felt.

Angelica Stevenson:

If it’s not the same situation, then have I ever felt that before? Have I ever thought something like that before? Have I ever seen something like that before or experienced it in some way, just in something different? So a perfect example is, when me and my husband were dating, I told him that I used to have five cats and those cats are my children and they help prepare me to budget and to pay bills and to do shopping and food because that’s what you actually have to do in a family too. And he was like, and then he told me about how his mom and the sister raised children. And he was like, “Well, that’s not the same thing. You’re talking about cats, I’m talking about people.” I was so mad at him for like a month after that. Because we wasn’t on the same page for a little bit. But at that time, all he was stuck on was the difference, the contrast of talking about pets and people, but not the actual action and feelings and emotions that were the same.

Angelica Stevenson:

I felt it. I did it. I thought it towards my cats and his mom and his sister did it towards human children. So you got to find what’s the same, you got to find the connection. And I help people to push past that contrast, to approach with connection, to approach with what’s the same, to what you know. And when you do, you will always get a better communication experience and enhance your relationship with that person. Because you’re not just touching them in their pocket, you’re touching them in where it matters, in their soul and their mind and their heart. And that’s what people hang on to, that’s what’s going to get passed down because they may not buy something from you, but they’re going to tell a friend about you. And if that person, like, “Really what do they do? Do they do this? Like, yeah [crosstalk 00:15:30]. You just got a new customer from being kind to somebody. So it all goes together.

Lyn Wineman:

I think you’re right. That is really great advice. I think particularly at a time right now, when we’re all focused on, it seems like there’s a lot of focus on differences, to really remember we’re all people who want to be validated and loved and listened to and understood. And yeah, that’s really great advice. So beyond that, so we’ve talked about being a really great listener. We’ve talked about treating your kids as employees. What other great advice do you have for those who might be struggling right now? Because honestly, we’ve been going through this kind of crazy time for a year now, what can people do to help them get out of the struggle?

Angelica Stevenson:

What I know people can do is take a mirror, go to a mirror, go to some water, look inside, look at your reflection, know that you’re beautiful, know that you are here for a reason and purpose. That’s why it is your soul’s purpose. You are God’s gift to this earth, you are. I tend to think like this, not only do people need you, but God needed you on this earth to complete something. There’s a mission that only you can do. There is a person that only you can reach. There is a product that only you have that can help save this life or make this person smile. And it’s by being who you are, who you were in the past, who you are now and to who you are working towards to, to be in the future. You are needed just as you are. So love who you are, be confident in who you are and accept all that you are because you are who you are for a reason. And you’re beautiful. You’re wonderful. And do it.

Lyn Wineman:

That is great. I’m going to ask you one more question before we jumped on, you told me why you call people kings and queens. And I thought, oh my goodness, that is so cool. Do you mind sharing that story again? About the babies, yeah. I love that.

Angelica Stevenson:

No problem. So the king and queen, were all kings and queens because when a baby is born, when the baby is coming, the first thing they say is, “Hey, the baby’s crowning.” So that lets you know right then and there that your crown is your head and when you come out, you’ve come into your kingdom, your queendom. So your body, your life is your kingdom and your queendom that you need to reign and rule well. So kings and queens have all the authority and all the power. So that’s what you have. You have all the authority and all the power to command yourself. And because of your connections to all creation, you can command all creation to help you get what you deserve, desire and dream, as well. You just got to know and own up to it and be like, I got this, my life.

Lyn Wineman:

I got this. Oh my goodness. That just makes me smile ear to ear. I love it. I love it so much. So we are having a fun time here talking, but it is kind of intimidating for me to talk with people who have their own podcasts. I mean, I know you have much more experience in this arena than I do. Can you tell us about the podcast? Tell us how to find the podcast and how it’s become an important part of your work.

Angelica Stevenson:

Definitely. My podcast is called Angelic Expressive Connections. I started on Anchor, which is great because they can distribute for me, which takes care of that. And that helps with five children. I don’t have to worry about that. It’s on Apple, Google, it’s on Tape Taps now and Verbal and Spotify. And I use that to share my universal angles, connections and communications through their giving movie messages. I watch movies and TV shows and I pick out life lessons from them and I share it. I’d have a series called the inside of you. And that’s where I take words, starting with I-N and E-N. And I decipher them to show you how everything of those words start inside of you. Like the word we use a lot, everybody uses it, is encouragement. Encouragement means inside of you is already the courage that you need to live your life, but nobody really thinks about it like that.

Angelica Stevenson:

You already have the courage inside of you to live, to move, to breathe and to accomplish your goals and your dreams. And I love it. I did not first, because I started it for the wrong reasons. Like, hey, you’re an author. You should get a podcast, it will help. And my theme was, I would take actions that people thought and said work best for my niche, my career path. But even though they think it was that, it doesn’t mean it was for me. So I thought about stopping it but then I realized, I actually like it now, because it’s quick, it’s on the go. If I need to, I can just pop on right quick and give a five, 10 minutes of what’s on my mind. And then I can just be out. And then I have my own flow. So I go with the flow. I don’t go with the schedule that they try to say you should have, because that’s just not me.

Angelica Stevenson:

So the thing I learned is that just because somebody says, this has been great for you, that doesn’t mean it has to be for you, that doesn’t mean you have to do it the way that everybody else is doing it because not everything works the same way for every body else.

Lyn Wineman:

Good for you. I think too, on this podcast, the ones that I seem to get the most comments from are the ones, like today, talking with you where I’ve had a lot of fun and just have fun talking with people, right? Except for, I always ask this next question because it’s my favorite question. And I keep all of these motivational quotes, but I am inspired by motivational quotes. And since you are creative and a poet, I can’t wait. Could you give us a few of your own Angelica words of wisdom, for our listeners?

Angelica Stevenson:

Yes. I’ll give you two that I use and that I teach to my children.

Lyn Wineman:

Great.

Angelica Stevenson:

The first one is a changed mindset will produce a change in behavior. The second one is, every action and non-action is a choice and every choice has a consequence, so choose the choice. Yeah. And then I say, so choose the action that gives you the consequence that you want for your life and that will help you walk in your purpose.

Lyn Wineman:

That is really nice. Choose the action that has the consequence of your choice. That is really nice. Both of those, great advice. So we’ve talked a little bit about your podcast, but I know you’re also an author. For people who would like to learn more, how can they connect with you or find you online?

Angelica Stevenson:

Great question. I am on social media. I’m on Twitter, under Angelic Expressive Connections, what is that? The handle, there it is, is AngelicExpress3. And then for Instagram and for Facebook, it’s @theConnectingAngel. And my website right now is solo.2/AngelicaStevenson. That right now has all my links of my books, where I’ve written and co-authored. It has my course on listenable that’s available to listen to and learn from, and yeah.

Lyn Wineman:

You have a lot of good stuff out there. I’ve always wanted to write a book. What’s it like writing a book?

Angelica Stevenson:

It’s great. It’s a wonderful feeling. When I can just sit down and take my ideas and also my program and put it in it. Because I can write in any general and I do actually, and then all my generals, I’m putting in words of messages and teachings in it to help people so I can reach anybody and action or in fantasy or in spirituality or in self-development and even in erotica, there’s some stuff in there.

Lyn Wineman:

Spicy.

Angelica Stevenson:

So I’m in all of them. And then my children, I’m writing books with three of my children. So that’s an extra 10 books that I’m working on.

Lyn Wineman:

Wow. Amazing.

Angelica Stevenson:

Thank you. And that’s another opportunity to reach the next generation because what I teach adults, I teach to my children and they get it. Like my daughter, one of the things I teach is your self powers and self encouragement is one of them. One day she came up to me and she told me, “Mom, I was scared to go up the ramp, but I encouraged myself and I did it.” And she’s seven. And I was like, “That’s so great, that you did it that you used your power, self encouragement.” And that’s what children need. They need to know the power of themselves and their minds. So it’s great that I can see it works for my children and I can put it in their books for children, just like them and future generations too, can start growing up with a new mindset.

Lyn Wineman:

That is neat. So how do you find time to write and podcast and counsel and teach and also be the mother of five children?

Angelica Stevenson:

I do most of my work at night when they are asleep.

Lyn Wineman:

Yep. I understand.

Angelica Stevenson:

And then also too, I realized that if I’m going to do something, I let people know ahead of time I’m mom and I’m going to have not interruptions. I’m going to have interactions with them, which you can learn from.

Lyn Wineman:

Interactions, I love that so much.

Angelica Stevenson:

It is what it is.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah. I love it.

Angelica Stevenson:

And my husband, he helps me stay balanced. He tells me when I need to calm mater, go sit down somewhere, get some sleep because I’m being too much.

Lyn Wineman:

A great spouse makes a big difference when you’re trying to work and raise kids and do all these things too. So Angelica, as we wrap up our time together today, what is the most important thing you would really like our listeners to remember about the work that you’re doing?

Angelica Stevenson:

I would like you to remember that, well, for one, I’m rooting for you.

Lyn Wineman:

Aww.

Angelica Stevenson:

I’m rooting for you guys. And I want you to know that you have already been empowered, that nobody empowers you because you’ve already been born with all the connections and powers and freedom to live your life, to accomplish your goals and your dreams. And you just got to go within, go within yourself to see it, to know it, to feel it and speak and think it, and it will manifest to you. It will be revealed to you in many different ways. So stay open to higher connections and communications and they will take you there.

Lyn Wineman:

Very nice. Angelica, I have a big old smile on my face after visiting with you today. And I really believe our listeners will find your writing and your work and your words to be very inspiring. Thank you so much for joining us.

Angelica Stevenson:

Thank you for having me, Lyn. You’re awesome. And right, I want to say, marketing is a very important thing that you guys are doing, especially for people like me, who knows it’s not their lane. We need people like you who know it is your lane.

Lyn Wineman:

Thank you.

Angelica Stevenson:

And you’re the best at it. So thank you so much for what you guys do.

Lyn Wineman:

I appreciate that. I appreciate it. All right. Thanks Angelica.

Announcer:

You’ve been listening to Agency for Change. If you’re enjoying these inspiring stories, please subscribe. Is there a change maker you’d like to recommend for this podcast? Just visit the KidGlo‪v website at kidglov.com to share, or to listen to more stories about the people behind positive change.

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