January 4, 2022

Justin Nabity

Topic
Healthcare

Announcer:

Welcome to Agency for Change, a podcast from KidGlov that brings you the stories of changemakers who are actively working to improve our communities. In every episode, we’ll meet with people who are making a lasting impact in the places we call home.

Lyn Wineman:

There is a growing movement for businesses to do more to address society’s critical challenges. And one way to do this is by becoming a certified B Corp. It’s a way for a company to show its commitment to the highest standards of performance, accountability and transparency.

Lyn Wineman:

And there are only five such businesses in all of Nebraska. So many of you know KidGlov recently became B Corp certified. And to celebrate we’re talking with a guest who is at the helm of another certified B Corp, one that’s changing the conversation around financial literacy in the medical field. Hey Justin, how are you today?

Justin Nabity:

I’m doing great. Thanks for having me.

Lyn Wineman:

Fantastic. So today we are joined by Justin Nabity, as you’ve just heard. Justin is founder and CEO of Physicians Thrive, a full-service financial planning company that helps doctors take control of their finances. And Justin, I’m really excited to talk with you today to learn more about the great impact you’re making on the world.

Lyn Wineman:

So let’s start by talking about Physicians Thrive. My understanding is your organization provides care to the people who essentially take care of us. Can you walk me through how you help doctors make healthy financial choices?

Justin Nabity:

It all starts at the very beginning. If you think about their focus in their academic years, it’s pretty much 100% on medicine, just as you would want it to be, as they’re caring for you, you want them to be so specialized, so knowledgeable, so focused on what your needs are that they can give you the best medical advice.

Justin Nabity:

And that comes with a cost. It comes with them not having the financial acumen, not having the business, not having the legal, all of the things that are essential for being successful in a career outside of the white coat.

Justin Nabity:

So think about all these years, there’s four years of medical school, then there’s at least three years of residency. And then some residencies are longer than that. Some will subspecialize and go into other areas. So for example, if somebody goes into internal medicine, to be a general practitioner, but they decide to sub-specialize in cardiology, that’s more training. And they could sub-specialize even further than that.

Justin Nabity:

So they spend all these years in an academic setting, learning, learning, learning, everything that they need to know to take care of their patients. And along the way, they’re not in business school, they’re not in law school. They’re not in any of these other schools. They need to know how to make decisions. And then what happens is they finish up their final year, in that final year, they get a contract, that contract shows them making six figures.

Justin Nabity:

And that sounds great. Doesn’t it? They’ve been waiting all these years earning kind of a middle income, sort of a paycheck. And they’re happy to take what they can get. They’re intimidated by talking about money. They don’t really know what they’re worth because the databases don’t show them what they’re really worth because they’re suppressed in terms of not having all of the best paying practices included.

Justin Nabity:

And they don’t know how to find good lawyers. And they’re kind of, they have a target on their back from salespeople. And so they just sign contracts blindly.

Lyn Wineman:

Wow.

Justin Nabity:

They don’t get legal help. They don’t know where to get good help. They don’t know how to find a qualified attorney. And they start off by getting underpaid in the first contract that they have.

Lyn Wineman:

Wow.

Justin Nabity:

80% of the time they do not get paid what they’re worth. And so that-

Lyn Wineman:

That’s amazing, Justin. It’s amazing.

Justin Nabity:

It already sets them up. It already sets them up at a disadvantage, and you’ve got reimbursements being reduced, CMS just came out with another reduction for them, and they were patting themselves on the back, ooh, we’re so great because they only reduced reimbursements by a smaller percentage than they were expecting to.

Justin Nabity:

And they were, you think back to when they were announcing it early on, a year ago or so they were saying, “Oh, it’s probably going to be here.” But then they finally got to it. “Oh, we celebrate that it wasn’t that much.”

Justin Nabity:

And here’s the problem. If you look at history and what their compensation has been relative to inflation, it has not kept up. Not just by a little bit, by a lot. And for certain specialties, it is way off the charts on how far off it is.

Lyn Wineman:

Wow. Everything you’ve said there is so interesting because I think a lot of us think about people in the medical field are, first of all, they’re so smart. They’re so dedicated. They’ve worked so hard.

Justin Nabity:

Right.

Lyn Wineman:

We often think about, the income that they make. That’s why all mothers want their kids to be doctors. Right? I think. But I understand what you’re saying. They work so hard to learn how to fix your heart, your bones, your brain, all of the things. And yet they get out of school and they’re expected to manage a business and have had very little practical training in that.

Justin Nabity:

Someone listening might say, well, so many of them are going into hospitals and becoming employed. Well, actually 47% of doctors, maybe 46, depending on how you look at the numbers, are in private practice.

Lyn Wineman:

Wow.

Justin Nabity:

Now not all of them are business owners, but there’s a lot more private practice than you think. Back to your point about your kids, wouldn’t it be great if your kid could get through college, could test well for the MCAT, could get into med school and all of that. Well, actually, if you survey the parents that are doctors and do they want their kids to go into medicine? It’s pretty shocking.

Lyn Wineman:

Really?

Justin Nabity:

Most of them tell their kids do not go into medicine.

Lyn Wineman:

Wow. I’m surprised.

Justin Nabity:

So it’s changed. In the last few decades things have changed so much. What’s being expected of them. They want to take, take, take more and more from doctor and give them less and less. Stress is a major issue. Burnout’s a major issue. And the pressure is on lawsuits, malpractice, there’s so many things.

Justin Nabity:

There’s a physician shortage in play right now. We published an article that will be live going up here next week that you can check out and it is not good. So you got debt, student loans is a major factor.

Justin Nabity:

You look at what it takes to go to medical school. And for somebody who doesn’t have scholarships, doesn’t have other resources, it’s $200,000. So they’re coming out with having a full mortgage without having a house or an asset to support it. They have it all up here in the head-

Lyn Wineman:

Right, right.

Justin Nabity:

… which is good and powerful and useful, and it’s worth it. It’s so worth it because of the income stream they got. But that’s how they come out and they’re not trained and equipped to take care of themselves. They’re so focused on taking care of other people, which is great, but they’re not in a position where they’re ready to really look out for how do they utilize what they can within the tax code.

Justin Nabity:

How do they save? How do they have a budget? How do they protect themselves? How do they get their estate plan in order? All these different things. They just don’t have that. And then what happens is they learn by a mistake and it sets them back. So they’re already, so much at a disadvantage, that’s why when I started the company, about 13 years ago, it was we’re going in the classroom, started traveling the Midwest, speaking in universities. It was received so well that the traveling-

Lyn Wineman:

Wow. So you’re starting early before they actually graduate. That’s amazing.

Justin Nabity:

So we’re in the academic years, I’ve got a book that’s just about finished on how to finance med school, how to finance it, how to pay it off. So we’re going to be teaching them even earlier to get on top of their, how to get really the finances in order for this thing so that maybe doesn’t have to be such a burden on the loan side.

Justin Nabity:

But it has to start early because what ends up happening is they get burned. They get more burned by people that they think they can trust, they don’t have their best interest in mind. There’s so many people in the financial field, other fields that are not fiduciaries, that do not look out for the best interests of them. And so they get jaded.

Justin Nabity:

They get soured, they get kind of closed off. And then what do they do at that point? How do they get good advice? Well, they might try to do stuff on their own and they’re so busy. From business experience-

Lyn Wineman:

Right.

Justin Nabity:

… the more you can delegate to people that you trust, that are proficient, that are experts-

Lyn Wineman:

That are better at it. Right.

Justin Nabity:

… that are better at it, optimize your time. Don’t try to become a Jack of all trades. You’ve already got enough on your plate. And so we serve as a fractional CFO function for a physician’s family, and that’s been amazing. Clients in all 50 states, all specialties, and we have referrals coming in all the time.

Lyn Wineman:

I bet you do.

Justin Nabity:

It’s incredible.

Lyn Wineman:

It’s very specialized what you do. So I think I read somewhere that you came from a family of doctors. So I’ve got to believe that your upbringing influenced your decision to form this business.

Justin Nabity:

So it was more so the fusion of two families really than just mine. So in my family, I grew up third generation in the financial industry. So I was on the financial track. And then I joined into the business with the family and got to see physicians that needed help, that struggled, that had issues.

Justin Nabity:

But then I married into a family of doctors as well. So I have brothers-in-law and their families that I kind of got to grow up and see them go through the grind of getting into med school and then finishing there and then traveling all over the country, different places for different stages of training.

Justin Nabity:

And then we do have doctors on the extended side of the family, but it was really kind of seeing the impact of not having really the fundamentals and all of the building blocks to be successful as an entrepreneur or a businessperson.

Justin Nabity:

And so being able to take finance and medicine together and mesh them was such a natural fit. So that’s how I got introduced to it. And I’d learn through family members, what they experienced being burned by employers and being burned by their own peers. You would think, it makes sense that a physician might have a hard time with a hospital executive or a health system executive, but if they work for a physician…

Lyn Wineman:

You would expect them to be more compassionate. Right?

Justin Nabity:

You would think that they would. But some of it could be because of just lack of, call it values and character. But the other piece of it is just lack of knowledge and knowhow and them kind of getting themselves into a pickle and not knowing how to deal with it. And then them having staff and personnel and not being able to manage it well. And maybe they had their own, the leadership or the founders of the practice had their own financial issues. And so it’s just kind of, is a domino effect on how it can bleed into the rest of the practice, not functioning as well as it should.

Lyn Wineman:

So Justin, that kind of talking about doing the right thing, right? And corporate responsibility, that leads me into then a conversation about becoming a certified B Corp. Now, my understanding is, was Physicians Thrive in business for about nine years before you went down that path? So I’m curious what caused you to go in that direction and what has the impact been?

Justin Nabity:

So I didn’t know anything about it. I was introduced to it. I was on a business trip with Jay, Jay from Firespring. And we were out overlooking this, like on a mountainside on this monster house complex thing in Costa Rica. And we were talking about business stuff and he was asking me, he’s, “Hey, have you heard of, do you know much about B Corps?”

Justin Nabity:

I’m like, “I know what an S Corp is. Because we are one, I know what a C Corp is. I know what LLCs are in being in corporate, that doesn’t exist. That’s not a structure.”

Lyn Wineman:

That’s a thing.

Justin Nabity:

“Actually, that’s not a thing. What planet are you on when you’re talking about a legal entity.” And not really understanding what it was, he explained it to me. And it was a kind of an aha moment to see a bar that could be set, because we were already on our way going that direction.

Justin Nabity:

And as a fiduciary for our clients that is a certified B Corp by itself.

Lyn Wineman:

Right.

Justin Nabity:

Doing what’s best for your people. And then there’s things you can do within your culture. And so when he was describing, these things is like, well man, we want to be such a people-focused organization and do whatever we can to take care of our team. And then at the same time, we want to give sight, physical sight, actually providing vision, the people that have vision impairment, glasses, and surgery to those who have it, every client we serve, we want to give sight to somebody who is in need.

Justin Nabity:

And we were learning about this through a client who’s an ophthalmologist. And he took us out to the Navajo Nation in southern Utah to learn about how the people that don’t have access to eyecare, what it does to them and how it affects everything in their family. And then that was step one, because from there we got interested in it and they invited us to go to Africa. And so maybe you’ve seen our video in Africa.

Lyn Wineman:

I have. The video is amazing, and actually since we’re mentioning it, I want to put in the show notes, where can people find the video of this. And we’re going to get into this in a little bit, but where can people find this full video?

Justin Nabity:

The video, so it used to be on the homepage of givesightglobal.org, and I think it still should be there. We did do some website changes. We’ve hired a CEO, we have a whole team now doing some really cool things and I’ll maybe share some more on that with you, but it should be on there. We had it on social media too. And it seemed like that was ages ago now.

Lyn Wineman:

Great.

Justin Nabity:

Because of how much has happened since then.

Lyn Wineman:

We’re going to find that Justin, and we’re going to make sure that gets into the show notes for sure. But I’m also going to say Jay Wilkinson from Firespring and his wife, Tawnya Starr, they both influenced us heavily too on becoming a B Corp because they’re out there really promoting B Corp certification.

Lyn Wineman:

But even more than that, I think promoting social corporate responsibility and doing the right thing. So I’m curious, you’ve been through the process, we’ve been through the process, I’m on record as saying it’s a way more rigorous process than I thought.

Lyn Wineman:

When I first heard, hey, you only have to get 80 points out of 200, and I’ve never done 40% or less on anything in my life. I thought this should be a piece of cake, but God, it’s hard. Right? I’m curious if you could give advice to other organizations who might consider beginning this journey, what would that advice be?

Justin Nabity:

So I think the way that you describe that, it could sound intimidating to pursue it. And it could sound like it’d be tough to qualify, and you’d have to really change your business. Almost do a business overhaul in order to get in there. But I think after going through it ourselves, there are more businesses out there that are already, if they were to go through it-

Lyn Wineman:

Already doing the things, right?

Justin Nabity:

Already doing it. And it could be that certification or that branding piece that could separate you and help you stand out as a conversation with really with our companies. I don’t know how it is for you, but as you’re talking to a potential customer, client or a potential business partner or alliance or whatever, we like to talk about what matters in the long term, legacy and impact and influence and those kind of things.

Justin Nabity:

So those things, we love having those kind of conversations and being able to have that be a part of the DNA of how you describe what your team’s about. It really is. It makes it way more fun. It gets into what their purpose and passion is too. So it really opens up the door to a different conversation that you would have with somebody that’s not just surface level. You got to go way deeper with somebody on what kind of makes their heart tick.

Lyn Wineman:

Justin, I would say that exactly. I mean, I think the benefit of the fact that it’s a 200 point scale and you need to score 80. What I take away from that is you are able to customize the way you fit into the B Corp certification.

Justin Nabity:

Right.

Lyn Wineman:

So for example, out of the five categories, we did really well on a couple of categories. We did not do very well on the environmental category. And it’s not because we are doing anything bad from a sustainability standpoint, but it’s because we haven’t been very thoughtful.

Lyn Wineman:

We don’t have a lot of policies being in a service business around sustainability, but now we can grow that. So I appreciate what you just said.

Lyn Wineman:

One thing we noticed about it too, is there’s quite a large network of B Corps. And I didn’t realize what a close-knit network it was and how active B Labs would be in introducing us to other businesses from across the country, across the world that we now can look to for resources, for business connections, for all kinds of things, which I think is…

Justin Nabity:

It’s like a brotherhood or a sisterhood that you get networked into. And so I like what you said about maybe scoring well in one area or two areas and then maybe not so much in the others. And what we really liked about our experience going through the process was, is that the person that helps onboard you to get you to submit things, they go to great lengths to help.

Justin Nabity:

They try to help you uncover all the nuggets of things that would fit and give you points and all legit stuff. It’s got to be legit.

Lyn Wineman:

Right.

Justin Nabity:

But I would agree with you, it can be kind of rigorous and I kind of liken it to a colonoscopy of your business, and more so because of how much it is, but it really helps you kind of get a sense of what are we doing with our business?

Lyn Wineman:

Absolutely.

Justin Nabity:

What’s the real impact of our business going to be long term? And it could be that most of it’s focused on internal aspects rather than external. Ours is a hybrid of both with our nonprofit focus. And our internal team building and atmosphere and the things that we do to incentivize and invest in our people.

Justin Nabity:

Anybody who would be interested in pursuing it, know that if you have the merits to become one, they will find it for you.

Lyn Wineman:

I agree with that.

Justin Nabity:

And if you don’t, they’re going to basically give you the laundry list of things that you can do to upgrade your business that way you can. I don’t really feel good about having just a barely getting in type of score. Because I guess the achiever in me from strength finder is like, that’s not, I mean-

Lyn Wineman:

Right.

Justin Nabity:

… I should be pushing the mid upper to get to closer to the 200 and I know where we can go and focus on improving areas of business to get stronger, have a higher score.

Lyn Wineman:

That’s exactly right. I’m going to say that just in our journey was similar in that we went into it wanting to have that certification that we were a good organization that was doing the right thing, and the process made us better because it pointed out areas where we could improve, we could solidify.

Lyn Wineman:

And now we have a roadmap because we’ll have to re-certify we have a roadmap for-

Justin Nabity:

Exactly.

Lyn Wineman:

… what we want to do to continue to get better. We’ve also found in today’s very difficult hiring market that being able to tell potential employees that we are a certified B Corp and to show them what we’re working on really differentiates us from other employers too.

Lyn Wineman:

So you have mentioned your nonprofit a couple of times, and I did hear your presentation at the Do More Good conference last year, where you talked about Give Sight Global and you provided a really startling statistic that day.

Lyn Wineman:

And I won’t forget it. You said, “One third of the population struggles with vision impairment.” And I guess I wear glasses, but I didn’t really think it was that much, but can you tell me how Give Sight Global is just addressing the issue of vision impairment?

Justin Nabity:

Absolutely. It’s such an issue. And I like to describe it as if it’s the most, of all the world problems, it’s like the easiest to fix. Because we work in the disability planning business. If somebody, if a physician isn’t able to work in their practice, and they don’t have the ability to operate or see patients or whatever, then all that income is in jeopardy.

Justin Nabity:

They’ve had student loans they’ve got to pay it back. So it’s the most fixable disability on the planet because it doesn’t take a lot. Glasses, surgery and medications. There are some minor things that can be done and that can change the trajectory of someone’s life from an education perspective, from an activity sports perspective, from a work perspective. It’s huge.

Justin Nabity:

And so what we’re doing with our nonprofit is initially we were, because we’ve gone through phases. Initially we were fundraising for the sole purpose of investing in teams that would go provide eyecare and training and skills transfer and those kinds of things to places where there’s one ophthalmologist for a crazy number of people. It’s totally unsustainable from a service perspective.

Justin Nabity:

And then we met a lot of people along the way and attracted talent, attracted leadership, attracted people that have connections. And so now what’s happened is we’ve brought on a CEO and he’s been amazing. He’s been in the eye sector for a long time and we’ve got some really cool things happening because we’re partnering with existing teams and places to expand surgery capabilities and build vision centers.

Lyn Wineman:

Wow.

Justin Nabity:

And so what’s happened is along the way, attracting more of supporters, we have somebody who unlimited every dollar that we bring in, they match with $3.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh my goodness.

Justin Nabity:

So every dollar turns into $4 because they love what we’re doing. And what’s unique is for example, in West Bengal, in Northeast India, we already got construction going on a project, it’s just about done where they’re going to go from 10,000 surgeries per year to 30,000 surgeries.

Lyn Wineman:

Amazing.

Justin Nabity:

So we’re tripling the volume of capacity there. We’re starting a project to build 70 vision centers and the vision centers will be owned by the people that live there. So we’re giving companies to people that they will own and operate themselves. And we’re being very focused and intentional about giving women a chance to own businesses.

Justin Nabity:

And so we’re targeting at 55% or higher female owned business structure.

Lyn Wineman:

I love that.

Justin Nabity:

And that way we’re providing the needs to the community and then we exit and go to the next community. So we just got approval for funding to do some work in Zambia. We’ve got some inroads into Kenya. Nepal wants us to get involved. And so-

Lyn Wineman:

Wow.

Justin Nabity:

… we’re taking this entrepreneurial model where we provide capital up front and then the revenue model is such that those that can afford, do pay. And those that can’t pay don’t pay, but there’s enough revenue. And with some support that we have in the community where it works mathematically to provide for the needs of the community.

Justin Nabity:

And so there’s also a portion that gets reinvested into a community fund to expand the efforts there. So we’re taking that model, and we’re doing it in West Bengal right now as we speak. And then we’re multiplying that in other places

Lyn Wineman:

Justin, it sounds like this whole idea of nonprofit, your nonprofit has grown so much. I’m glad to hear that you’ve hired a CEO for it, right? Because it sounds like it’s just taken off.

Justin Nabity:

It was one thing for us to just fundraise and then deploy funds to teams that have needs and making sure that they were providing the quality of care and the training, but now it’s like, it’s just too expensive to send people places versus if we can work with the community there and expand what their capabilities are so that way they can own it themselves and can take care of the needs. That’s really where our focus has been.

Lyn Wineman:

As a storyteller myself, I’m just thinking about all of the people who have been helped. I mean, you’ve helped entrepreneurs, you’ve helped healthcare providers, but most importantly, you’ve helped people give them the gift of sight. I mean, are there any examples of individuals you were able to help that really stand out in your memory?

Justin Nabity:

Well, I wasn’t prepared to tell the story. I’m not sure.

Lyn Wineman:

Do you want to? If not, we can cut it out.

Justin Nabity:

Well, what’s interesting is I won’t go into all the details, but we had a gentleman who found out about us. From a place that we were not focused on, out of the blue. He started hitting me up on LinkedIn and saying, “Hey, I heard about your organization. Could you sponsor my surgery? Because I don’t have the resources.”

Justin Nabity:

And we don’t have the capacity to help every single person on that basis in a place where we don’t have a team there and all this and that. And he was just so focused on getting help. And he was relentless. I was so impressed by him, that I didn’t know the people, the place, the institution. And so what we had to do was have the people that were helping him do video calls. I made them give me a video tour on Skype or whatever.

Justin Nabity:

We had a camera we used. And I had them take me through the whole facility, go through, meet the doctor, meet everybody, make sure that this is legit. And pay the right institution. And he had lost his job because he couldn’t see anymore. He was done working.

Justin Nabity:

His life, it wasn’t going to work. And his marriage was essentially going to be in jeopardy-

Lyn Wineman:

Right.

Justin Nabity:

… because he wasn’t going to be able to do what he needed to do to take care of his wife and his family and everything else. And it was causing a real rift in the family. And somehow through technology, he found out about Give Sight Global and asked if we would sponsor. And we went through all of the steps and with our leadership team, we were able to vet the organization and make sure that the funds got the right place.

Justin Nabity:

And every single holiday now, US holidays, he sends me messages. And it’s as if I have been like the gift that he received from being able to get the help that now he’s back to work, he’s finishing school stuff and-

Lyn Wineman:

Amazing.

Justin Nabity:

…. it’s totally amazing. I’m not really sure why I was going to share this, I share this example because it really fit within the model we’re talking about. But I was so impressed with, I mean, his life depended on it and he was going to do whatever he could.

Justin Nabity:

And he was willing to go to the greatest lengths, he didn’t even leave, I think he was like two hours away from the place. And so the way that we had it work through the details to get him, get it approved because we’re talking about international sending money. And it’s got to be legit.

Lyn Wineman:

It does make you skeptical a little bit.

Justin Nabity:

Absolutely.

Lyn Wineman:

Right?

Justin Nabity:

Absolutely.

Lyn Wineman:

We’ve all gotten messages about sending money internationally where the answer is no and delete that email and don’t click on anything as soon as possible.

Justin Nabity:

Exactly. Absolutely.

Lyn Wineman:

Right?

Justin Nabity:

So he videoed with me, we got him, he got to a phone where we videoed, I got to meet him and our team, our whole team got to meet him. Talk about the coolest thing where he got to share beforehand and afterward that his life is going to be able to continue as he had wanted it to versus him being stuck at home and not being able to get a job anywhere.

Lyn Wineman:

What I love about that story is it really speaks to the importance of what you’re doing with gifts like global. And I think about Justin, how many other people are out there that don’t even know your name or they don’t even know the work that went behind it, but all of the people you are giving their lives back to. I think that’s just amazing.

Justin Nabity:

Glasses by themselves. When you have corrective vision, when you get it corrected, it’s a 40% increase in productivity. Just glasses. And how many-

Lyn Wineman:

If I took my glasses off right now, I wouldn’t be able to read and I wouldn’t even, I can see you, but that’s about it.

Justin Nabity:

How many people have glasses or contacts and they don’t even think twice about it now because it’s just so accessible for us.

Lyn Wineman:

Right.

Justin Nabity:

And we do have some, like we’re going to be doing some work here locally as well. So we are internationally focused on these projects, but we also are going to be bringing that model local. And we have some-

Lyn Wineman:

That’s great.

Justin Nabity:

… development going on right now where we’re looking to take care of some very high need areas, even locally.

Lyn Wineman:

That’s great.

Justin Nabity:

We’re super excited to be able get kind of a chance for our team here at Physicians Thrive to be able to experience and see the work-

Lyn Wineman:

I love that.

Justin Nabity:

… down even on local bases.

Lyn Wineman:

Well, congratulations. And thank you on all of that great work. I mean, everything you’ve said here, Justin is very motivational and I’m going to transition to the next question, which is always my favorite question, I ask it on every podcast, but I love motivational quotes. I have some of my favorite authors, some of my favorite words of wisdom that I look to when I need inspiration, but I would love to hear some Justin Nabity original words of wisdom to inspire our listeners.

Justin Nabity:

Original. Wow.

Lyn Wineman:

Original.

Justin Nabity:

I hope this is original. I don’t think I took this from anywhere else, but I think I was the first time, when I put it down and I don’t remember it coming from anywhere else. The quote is, do something today to make you believe in yourself more tomorrow.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh wow. I’ve never heard that one. Do something today to make you believe in yourself tomorrow. Did I get that right?

Justin Nabity:

More tomorrow.

Lyn Wineman:

More tomorrow.

Justin Nabity:

What can you do today? What’s one thing you can do today? And for me, I think about one of the biggest regrets I have so far is not taking enough risk. It’s something that my business partner and I talk about. And yes there’s kind of a scary part of risk.

Lyn Wineman:

Right.

Justin Nabity:

But reward and growth and everything comes from taking risks. And what’s one thing that you can do to grow as a person, to try new things, to put yourself out there, to make that possible. And if we do that every single day, what’s going to happen after a week, a month, a year? Do something today to make you believe in yourself more tomorrow.

Lyn Wineman:

More tomorrow. I love that. We talked a little bit before where we got on the podcast about how you are a triathlete. You think about all of the workouts you do, the muscles you build, but risk taking also a muscle, right?

Justin Nabity:

Sure. Sure.

Lyn Wineman:

Confidence also something that you build up. So that is really, really good. Very, very good one. So Justin, for our listeners, who’d like to learn more about either Physicians Thrive or Give Sight Global, how can they find out more about both of those organizations?

Justin Nabity:

You can contact us through our websites. You can get ahold of me on social media. I’d love to connect with you on Facebook or Instagram, LinkedIn, any of those, physiciansthrive.com, givesightglobal.com givesightglobal.org. And we can connect online and take it from there.

Lyn Wineman:

Fantastic. And for anybody who didn’t get that, we’ll make sure to have those links in the show notes online as well. So as we wrap up our conversation today, what is the most important thing you would like our listeners to remember about the work that you’re doing Justin?

Justin Nabity:

That’s a great one. So on the for-profit or the nonprofit side?

Lyn Wineman:

I’d say either or both, either or both.

Justin Nabity:

If we’re talking about physicians in particular, there’s sometimes this expectation that physicians should know everything. And we have that, we put that pressure on them. Because we assume that if they’re a doctor, they’re kind of a know it all or they should be a mini-God and should be able to solve all things.

Justin Nabity:

And I’ll just say that in my experience, from what I’ve learned from all the people that we’ve served and they’re coming on board with us, that science and medicine and the body, the body is so fascinating. It’s so complex.

Justin Nabity:

And nutrition, sleep, exercise, activity, there are so many factors. It’s a mystery. So much of it’s a mystery and physicians are givers. They give to a fault and they really do everything that they can. Yes, there’s times where there’s mistakes made. Yes, there’s things that should be done in those times. I get that.

Justin Nabity:

But they’re amazing people. And I would say that the perception or the kind of the stereotype that if you’re a doctor, you have it all figured out or they’ve got the car, they’ve got the house, they’ve got this and that, that’s actually not a real experience.

Lyn Wineman:

Right.

Justin Nabity:

That they are living and stress, depression, anxiety is real. They’re human too. So maybe I would just share that physicians are humans too. They are just like you.

Lyn Wineman:

Really good point.

Justin Nabity:

I’ve met so many from so many backgrounds. They are no different than you. They just love what they, like medicine attracts people and not because of finance. Many of the people that go into their specialty, they go into it because of, they had a personal issue with their own health. They want to pursue diabetes because they had it in their family or something along those lines.

Justin Nabity:

And so they really have a love and a care for people. And so think about certified B Corps. It’s all about corporate, social, like social and environment are good. They really are kind of the essence of what certified B Corp is, but just in the healthcare setting.

Justin Nabity:

And so they’re amazing people, they’re just like you, they really are. And the way the system is today, there’s a lot of pressure on them.

Lyn Wineman:

Makes it rough.

Justin Nabity:

Just keep that in perspective. And they don’t know everything and it’s good to get second opinions. And sometimes it takes a team of multiple different collaborations to get to the bottom of what something is. And so nobody knows everything. No one person does. It takes a lot.

Lyn Wineman:

Justin, I think very few of us are held to a standard where we can’t make mistakes, right? Or where there’s such a-

Justin Nabity:

Correct.

Lyn Wineman:

… significant outcome when a mistake is made and the pressure for that has to be amazing. So I have really enjoyed this conversation and I appreciate how you brought all of that together at the end about physicians and being a certified B Corp.

Lyn Wineman:

And I’m so glad that we had the chance to talk and I appreciate you and your organization being a role model, being one of the few B Corps now in Nebraska. But I think this is an invitation for anyone who’s listening, who runs a company to follow that path. And I bet Justin, you would, or I would answer any questions people might have.

Justin Nabity:

How many certified B Corps are we going to get do you think, after listening to this? How many more Nebraska companies are going to join our tribe, do you think after this?

Lyn Wineman:

There’s a challenge. Well, there’s five now. I think it would be a great goal to double that. Right? I wonder if there’s five-

Justin Nabity:

Double that. Let’s see this podcast help double the count in Nebraska. That would be so cool.

Lyn Wineman:

All right. That sounds good. So if you’re out there and you’re thinking about going down this path, let Justin or I know, and we’ll make sure to give you lots of good advice as will I’m sure the other B Corps and our friends at SEAchange as well.

Justin Nabity:

For sure.

Lyn Wineman:

Justin, I fully believe the world needs more people like you. Congratulations on all the great work that you’re doing. And thank you for taking time to share with us today.

Justin Nabity:

You’re welcome. Thank you.

Announcer:

We hope you enjoyed today’s Agency for Change podcast. To hear all our interviews with those who are making a positive change in our communities or to nominate a changemaker you’d love to hear from, visit KidGlov.com to get in touch. As always, if you like what you’ve heard today, be sure to rate, review, subscribe, and share. Thank for listening. And we’ll see you next time.

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