June 14, 2022

Kim Goins

Topic
Nonprofit

Kim Goins:

Always be in the process of building meaningful and authentic relationships because they matter.

Announcer:

Welcome to Agency for Change, a podcast from KidGlov that brings you the stories of changemakers who are actively working to improve our communities. In every episode, we’ll meet with people who are making a lasting impact in the places we call home.

Lyn Wineman:

It started out as an organization dedicated to providing a safe alternative for boys who were roaming the streets of Hartford, Connecticut. And today 162 years later, Boys and Girls Clubs of America serves all young people, helping them reach their potential and find success within their doors.

Lyn Wineman:

With locations all over the United States, these clubs offer a second home to kids who need it, with a focus on academic success, good character and citizenship, and healthy lifestyles. Hello everyone. This is Lyn Wineman, president and chief strategist at KidGlov. Welcome to another episode of the Agency for Change podcast. Today, we’re joined by Kimberly Goins, executive director of Boys & Girls Clubs of Lincoln/Lancaster County, which is empowering youth to reach their full potential. Kim, I am eager to talk with you today. Welcome to the podcast.

Kim Goins:

Thanks Lyn. Thanks for having me. I look forward to our time together, and more importantly, getting an opportunity to connect with your audience.

Lyn Wineman:

Ah, thanks, Kim. We’ve already had a few laughs before we hit record, but I can tell this is going to be a really fun conversation. And just for those who may not know what Boys & Girls Clubs of Lincoln/Lancaster County does, could you fill us in a bit?

Kim Goins:

Absolutely Lyn. At its core, the Boys & Girls Club is first and foremost, a safe place to go for youth. We are a community organization that provides before and after school programming at two site locations, and within that, we also provide high impact, high return programming that really centers around workforce development outcomes, along with youth leadership development, internships and healthy lifestyles.

Lyn Wineman:

Kim, those are all really great and really important questions. But before we dive deeper into Boys & Girls Clubs and get too far into the interview, we’ve had a chance to talk with your husband, Tony Goins, on the podcast before. So it’s great to get a chance to talk with you, and before you came on the show, you said one unique thing about you is you are a serious crafter, not just at crafter, but a serious crafter. What do you like to create, and how did you become interested in this?

Kim Goins:

So I like to create a lot of things. And if you come to my home Lyn, if you can imagine it, you really can create it in my home. I have a whole entire room dedicated to crafting. I’m going to tell you what I enjoy, but let me tell you how I got there.

Kim Goins:

So in a previous position, I had a very challenging day with a youth who had really been violated. And my backstory, and we’ll get into more of my background here in a moment, but I’m actually not a case manager, right? I’ve spent my years in fundraising, which means I’m not necessarily equipped to have some of those really emotionally charged conversations, and so a lot of my friends run when they’re having tough days, and so full disclosure, I’ve never ran-

Lyn Wineman:

Me neither.

Kim Goins:

I’m not necessarily coordinated, and just a little tid bit, if you see me running, run.

Lyn Wineman:

Someone’s chasing you, huh?

Kim Goins:

Someone is chasing me. And so with this day, I make the decision that I am going to run out this frustration. And so I leave my phone at home, I put on the one pair of yoga pants and the one pair of training shoes that I owned at the time, and I take off.

Kim Goins:

Well, I probably get, I kid you not, a quarter mile into it, and I should also mention I’m running and crying, the ugly cry, because it was such a tough day, and about a quarter mile into my run, I stopped and I said, “This is dumb. Who runs?” I don’t like running, and I didn’t have a phone to have someone come pick me up, and I was sharing that with someone, they said, “Well, hey, I craft, and I have this tool called a Cricut.” I had never heard of it, but I went to Michael’s the next day and bought one, and some little old lady through me what’s called a Cricut shower, and bought me a lot of crafting supplies, and the rest is history.

Lyn Wineman:

Wow. Wow.

Kim Goins:

Yes. Yes. And so the one thing though, Lyn, that I really enjoy making, not just for my family members, but for my friends, is I do have a wood cutting laser machine.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh my goodness.

Kim Goins:

Yes. And so when a loved one is no longer with family members, if they want to memorialize their handwriting, so whether it’s a recipe for a cutting board, or just a really great saying, I can take the literal handwriting and have it engraved into a piece of wood for a memento that’s long lasting, that can be handed down. It’s one of the favorite things that I get a chance to do.

Lyn Wineman:

People can’t see me because we’re just recording a podcast, but my jaw is on the floor. That is such a great thing to do. So, so neat, Kim. I got to agree though, I think crafting sounds a hundred times better than running, for sure.

Lyn Wineman:

So just along that path, you mentioned you’re not a case worker, and I do… My heart goes out to case workers and people who are in the field, because it takes a special skillset, special training. But so I’m curious, what brought you to Boys & Girls Club, and what brought you to Nebraska in general? That’s a big question, but how would you describe that journey?

Kim Goins:

Yeah, for sure. So, one, I’ve spent my entire career in the nonprofit sector, so I’ve probably done, I kid you not, every single job. I have worked with the clients directly in youth programming, I have fixed commercial toilets by watching YouTube videos, I have raised money, I have done administrative work, and so it’s where I’ve spent my career since my early twenties, and I have a passion for helping support those in need, and I really love serving.

Kim Goins:

My journey here to Nebraska is a very simple one. Like a lot of friends that I’ve met along the way, my husband took a job here. And I’m sure he shared with your audience previously, he was working at JP Morgan Chase. He had really big operations in India and Mexico, few other places, co-located between Dallas, where we were living, and in New York. And we kind of get down to one kid in our home, out of the four, and I think he really wanted to slow down quite a bit. He receives a call from a headhunter who gives him an opportunity to come to Nebraska. Now, I think it’s important for me to say to your audience, so first I say, “Where’s Nebraska?”

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah. He mentioned, I think, that he was afraid to tell you.

Kim Goins:

Yes. “You want to do what?” And so I said, “Well, I don’t know about this.” And our youngest one was getting ready to go into her freshman year, and she was like, “What do they wear there? What do they drive?” Because in her head, it was a lot of horse and buggies, and burlap sacks for clothes. And so I drop him off at the airport for his interview, he kisses my forehead and he says this, he says, “Babe, it is just the courtesy.” And I said, “So you’re not moving me to Nebraska?” He said, “Absolutely not.” And this man gets here, two days later he calls me and he says, “I need you to book a flight, get here now. Something special is happening in Nebraska.”

Kim Goins:

And I said, “Oh my god, what?” And I will tell you, he was not kidding, Lyn. I had an opportunity to fly right out. When you meet the kindness of the people here, the quality of living here, whereas I really thought we’d spend here a year, we’ve been here now since 2014, and this is home for us. So we absolutely loved living here, and so Nebraska is home. And then specifically my journey to the Boys & Girls Club, I’ve had an opportunity to work with a couple other nonprofits in the community. I received a phone call from a local community leader here who was one of the initial founders of the Boys & Girls Club, and she said, “We have these really big dreams. This organization is really right for the next steps, would you consider coming and joining us?” And it was a really easy decision to make. When you see the quality of the board, the programming, and the overall Boys & Girls Club movement, it was a very easy decision to make, to come join this team.

Lyn Wineman:

Ah, that just sounds great, Kim. I have to say, Nebraska is lucky to have you and Tony. You are great ambassadors for the state, and Boys and Girls Club, also very lucky to have you on the team. Some things that you’ve mentioned, I think that there’s often a misperception that a nonprofit job is going to be an easy job, right? But-

Kim Goins:

Yes.

Lyn Wineman:

You have had to wear a lot of hats. So we like to try and give our guests on the show an opportunity to dispel any misconceptions about what a particular organization does, or assumptions about who they serve, because sometimes an organization that’s been around as long as Boys and Girls Clubs, people kind of have an impression, but it may not be up to date. Is there anything you’d like to dispel, or anything that’s kind of incorrect in the public mind right now?

Kim Goins:

For sure. I think there are two things that quite often I find is a misconception with the Boys and Girls Club. One, because we are located on school property, on the LPS property, oftentimes people think we only serve the kids in those schools, and that’s not true. We do serve those youth, but we also have a wider range of programming, to really support the entire community. And for us, we do that through our food pantries, we have four currently, we have two additional ones built. So we are serving the community through our community food pantries, and especially in areas where you have some of the food desert happening, right?

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah.

Kim Goins:

So we want to be able to fill that gap. And I think the biggest misconception about our organization is that we only serve the poor kids, or the bad kids, or the kids that no one else wants. And I will tell you this, are some of our kids living in poverty situations? Yes. But I think people need to know about our kids, that they are resilient, and they are problem solvers, and they build their strength by really overcoming challenges, not by acquiescing to those challenges.

Kim Goins:

I think it’s important for people to know, we never define people by their worst moments, and so we don’t use the term poor. I don’t even put it in our grants, right?

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah.

Kim Goins:

That’s the condition of the community, not the condition of our young people that we’re serving. They just need some specific support to step into their potential. We really focus on helping overcome some of those systemic barriers while addressing their personal challenges, and we’re proud of the work that we do here.

Lyn Wineman:

Kim, that’s amazing. I can hear the passion in your voice, and I think the kids are lucky to have you on their side. I think that is fantastic. As I was preparing for today, I was looking at your website, and one of the things that’s listed under your vision is not to duplicate services and programs, but to provide a tighter safety net for children and youth. And I’m curious, why is that such an important part of your organization, and how do you set yourself apart from other organizations that serve youth?

Kim Goins:

For sure. I think what’s really important for your listeners to know is really the real scope of the Boys & Girls Clubs. So, whereas we have the two locations here in Lincoln, Nebraska, you have Omaha that’s right up the road from us, that’s serving, I believe over 14 sites. In the entire Boys & Girls Club movement, you have over 4,400 clubs.

Lyn Wineman:

Wow.

Kim Goins:

You have over 11,000 sites, and you actually have 450,000 youth each and every day who walk through some Boys & Girls Club across this country, including on tribal land, as well as on military sites, right? So we have this really far and wide reaching way to make an impact. When I get that down here on a very local level, I think what’s important to know about our organization and that I think that really sets us apart from other youth development organizations, get this who are doing phenomenal work, so keep supporting them because rising tides lift all boats.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah.

Kim Goins:

But I think the one thing is this, is whereas a lot of organizations, including us, really keep our pulse on the social needs of the kids, right? So food, clothing, housing, their education, I mean, that’s really important that has to be addressed. But when you look at our program and in the way that we deliver results, it is really we have a priority on the youth workforce. In any given day in this state, you have about 50,000 plus jobs that are going unfilled. We have a highly under skilled workforce in this state, and when you look at the lowest unemployment that’s ever been on record, it’s happening right now. We even have companies who are looking outside of this state for talent to fill those jobs. And what we’re saying is this, we’re going to always keep our finger on the social pulse and the needs that need to be fulfilled.

Kim Goins:

However, we’re also providing and prioritizing their economic futures, and so specifically what that looks like, Lyn, is how are we assuring that in the future they actually don’t need housing provided, they don’t need food provided, they don’t need clothes provided. And we’re doing that through a workforce development framework, so all of our program is centered around three verticals, which are technology, so consider that whole STEM, with a real priority on technology and kind of an offshoot of gaming, and I’m happy to talk about that some more. Entrepreneurship, and job skills, and career readiness, right? So for a kid who doesn’t have a plan to go to your traditional four year, or even two year college, then how do we make sure that they have the skills to go directly to work?

Kim Goins:

And then we underpin those three verticals with three things. Gallup Strengths. So a hundred percent of our staff, our club members, and their families, have access and take the Gallup Strengths Finders. We also provide leadership development, and I don’t mean your traditional out-of-the-box buzz word. And right before the pandemic, another board member and I, we interviewed around 50 CEOs here locally, and we said, “What are you some of the challenges you’re having with your current workforce, and especially some of your younger workforce members that are entering the market? And then what are you seeing 10 years down the road when you kind of look around the corner?” And so we really just dropped those notes we took to the University, some really smart people kicked us out, some proprietary curriculum.

Kim Goins:

To really also now address some of those soft skill needs. So for example, what does workforce place gossip look like, right? How do you teach that in a way so that a young person can identify it? Most importantly, pivot away from it, while keeping the relationship intact, so that they can really start growing their careers. And then lastly, it’s underpinned by healthy lifestyle. So not necessarily, but including, what you put in your body, but also how do you delay some of those risky behaviors? Drugs, alcohol, premarital sex, et cetera. So that you can delay those risky behaviors, so you can really lean in and become whatever it is that your heart desires, while keeping them in this community.

Lyn Wineman:

Wow. Wow. Wow. Wow. Wow. All of that you just said is so amazing. And what I really love about it is you’re focusing on the kids today. What do they need today? Because you got to think about the food, clothing, school, you got to do that first, but then you’re looking at their futures, and their futures, the future of the community. I just think that is all amazing. I didn’t realize, Kim, that Boys & Girls Clubs did all of that. So I’m really, really glad that you shared it. I am curious, after hearing that, all of that great information, you’re doing very impactful work, which is one of my favorite things. Are there any kids who have come through your doors that you feel like you’ve made a particularly big impact on?

Kim Goins:

We have a young girl, and this actually happened just last week, and like most organizations, especially in the nonprofit [world], this becomes work, and sometimes you have to take a giant step back to see and really understand how you’re changing lives here. And so a young lady who was being moved to her ninth foster home, in the last couple of years, her ninth one, entered our program. And as you can imagine, this young lady was very shy, very reserved, had really made herself small as to not be seen or heard, because she found that if she did those things, then she could stay in homes a little bit longer, right? And because we don’t turn any student away because of the inability to pay an IEP et cetera, if there’s a youth in need, and that’s all youth, right, could benefit from our programming, we accept them in.

Kim Goins:

Well, this young lady found out last week that she was going to be moved to another home, and she came up to our program director and said, “If you could help me, if you could help me, because I finally made friends because of the programing at BGC,” right? And started building her confidence. She started seeing people who look like her every day, because we are proud that we are in some of the diverse schools in the city, and I’m proud to say that our staff reflects the population that we serve, right. And so she was-

Lyn Wineman:

That’s fantastic.

Kim Goins:

Yes. So she was able to make some really deep connections, and she wanted to go to prom. And she had worked, and she had saved money, and she’s about to be taken from this home. Well, our VP of programs jumped right into action. She was able to make some connections with our community partners, because all we do is youth development, we actually don’t do the other wraparound services, we are just very strategic in partnering to make sure we’re taking care of the whole child. And so we were able to put in a real plan to keep this young lady here, and intact, with friends and families that she knows. Now, is it temporary? Yes. But she’s also a senior. And we’re working now, even at the state level, to ensure that there’s more of a plan for when she does graduate. Because as you know, Lyn, with the work that you do, so many of these young people, they age out of the system, they don’t have a plan, and we’re maniacal about making sure that they do.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh, that’s fantastic. Right. They need a support system. That just honestly gives me chills and goosebumps, Kim. That’s a great story, and I’m glad you shared it. I am curious too, because I think you started this job right before the pandemic?

Kim Goins:

Yes.

Lyn Wineman:

How did the pandemic affect Boys & Girls Clubs? Because I’m sure it must have. How did it impact your ability to help the community, and what was that experience like as a new leader of the organization?

Kim Goins:

For sure. For sure. So Lyn, I did, I started this position in October of 2019. Then I spent most of November in Germany, then you come back, it’s Christmas. So I really started January and ran smack dab into the pandemic, in late February, early March of 2020. And like so many organizations we had to pivot early, and I think we were impacted in a lot of different ways, both positively and negatively. I think it’s really important though, to start off, when you have a dynamic board, and dynamic leadership, the way that the Boys and Girls Club does, it was really easy for us to make some decisions quickly.

Lyn Wineman:

That’s great.

Kim Goins:

So for example, our finance committee, we met every single Friday for 30 minutes for months, and that’s the community, giving of their time, and they have their own jobs, right? They still kind of falling apart, but they’re committed to the work. And so this was not a singular effort. This was the board coming together, really galvanizing our team internally, to say, “Our community is in need.” As you know, for the first time ever, you had individuals who had never asked for help, for the first time were having to ask. And so how do you do it with dignity? And that’s what we focused on. And so our doors at our school sites close when LPS close. And this is what is unique. This is the gift of the Lincoln community. Churches started opening their doors to us, for us to be able to deliver programs.

Kim Goins:

We were able to build capacity for some of our first responders who needed support right then. Lyn, we also provided 2,000 dinner meals a week for several weeks.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh my goodness.

Kim Goins:

And we didn’t care if you had a youth, we didn’t care if you had a kid that didn’t go to our school. Full disclosure, you could have driven in from one of the smaller towns, if you were hungry, we fed you.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh, that’s just great.

Kim Goins:

Yes. And if you go to our Facebook even, there’s not a lot of photos about that, because this is what we said, we were here to do the right thing. This was not our opportunity for photo ops. It was the time for us to roll up our sleeves, lace up our boots, and be feet on the ground to support this community-

Lyn Wineman:

I appreciate that.

Kim Goins:

In a crisis. Yeah. And so there are no pictures of us handing out the sacks, even though we did it for, again, thousands of them each week. There are no pictures of the families in their cars. It was the community coming together and serving. And so that’s what we were able to do, was just really galvanize the community within that though, right, we learned some things about ourselves. And the first thing we learned, which was pretty good for me as a leader of this organization, was the community perception of us. It was when I discovered that the community really didn’t see us as a community-based organization. So it helped us understand how we needed to engage with our marketing, what information were we sharing? Because you can get so busy with doing the work, and not telling the story.

Lyn Wineman:

Yes. That happens all the time, right? It happens all the time. But telling the story really connects you to the community, and connects you to donors, and connects you to grant makers, and even connects you with volunteers and those who need your services. So I’m glad you’re telling the story.

Kim Goins:

That’s right. Yeah. So we were able to hire for the first time ever, our director of marketing has really closed that gap for us to tell the story. And so we also learned how to better streamline our programming, right? Because what we knew is that once we knew that the pandemic was going to be more than two weeks-

Lyn Wineman:

Yes. That’s right. Funny that we thought it was going to be two weeks at one point.

Kim Goins:

Yeah. I spoke those words out loud.

Lyn Wineman:

Me too.

Kim Goins:

Two weeks, and then it’s over. Well, once we realized that it was going to be more than two weeks, Lyn, it really helped us firm up, alongside of our board, just a long-term strategy. So when you started looking at workforce development, work from home, right? What are the needs that are happening when you think of internet access, access to technology, even a space for a youth to be able to do their homework, in their home, right? They may have multiple young people there. We also found that you may have a high schooler who was then watching up to… We had one young person in our program that was watching 13 kids each day.

Lyn Wineman:

Wow.

Kim Goins:

Yeah. Because the other family members were working. They didn’t have childcare, and so they were dropping them off there, and so we were able to create programs that we could deliver in real time, so that the high schooler themselves wasn’t having the learning loss. But then we could also support some of those young people in the home who were not necessarily registered Boys and Girls Club members.

Kim Goins:

So again, it’s really about taking care of that entire household, so that they can really thrive, because Lyn, the way I think about our work is this. This is generational work, this is legacy. We do not have an option to fail. Will we drop some balls in our day-to-day work? Absolutely. But if we fail, it is generational impact we have. And again, we have this goal of ensuring that families can take care of themselves. Because when I see that number, that 50% of our kids right now in LPS are in poverty, 50%, the report came out-

Lyn Wineman:

That’s just such a sad number. For such a great community, we got to work on that.

Kim Goins:

We do. And that’s what we’re doing. So we talk about playing the long game, whereas again, they may need the housing support now, the food support now. What we’re seeing, if you send your kid to me, if you send them over to the Boys and Girls Club, we will help skill build your young person, and get them connected to jobs in this community, so that they want to stay here. But more importantly, now they have access to healthcare, to a quality wage, so they can take their kids, their families, on a vacation.

Kim Goins:

It increases their quality of life in our community. It decreases even mental health, and things that look like social issues, are sometimes, and get this, most often, are really just economic issues. If you can solve this issue over here, we can start solving some of these social issues. We want to make sure that our young people are getting to work, and meaningful work that pays them well.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah. Wow. And you mentioned there’s no option to fail, but yet I think about the excitement of succeeding, right? And I think about the potential of every kid that comes to Boys and Girls Clubs, and I think that’s amazing. So Kim, I understand the organization hit a milestone this year.

Kim Goins:

Yes.

Lyn Wineman:

Could you tell me more about that?

Kim Goins:

I am so excited. As a matter of fact, Lyn, this is the first time I’ve announced this out loud.

Lyn Wineman:

Ah, yay. Here we go.

Kim Goins:

We are 15, this year. 15.

Lyn Wineman:

Wow. 15. You’re an adolescent almost with the ability to drive.

Kim Goins:

We are. I mean, just think about the day you woke up from 14 and you turned 15.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh, that was way too long ago to remember.

Kim Goins:

It was a great time, because you started thinking I get to drive.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah.

Kim Goins:

I get to stay out later. So we are excited to announce this is our 15 year anniversary.

Lyn Wineman:

Congratulations.

Kim Goins:

Thank you. Yes. 15 years of serving this incredible community, 15 years of partnering with amazing organizations like Duncan Aviation, like TMCO, like the University to make all of these great things happen. So thank you so much for asking about it’s a very exciting milestone for us.

Lyn Wineman:

You have some great partners in there too. So the organization is turning 15. Thank you for announcing that here. What do you see for the next 15 years? What do you think is different? What do you think is the same? How will the organization operate?

Kim Goins:

Yeah. So currently we have two locations. I think we will start, in the next 15 years, I have no doubt we’ll have some type of presence in every single LPS school who needs some support, and not only in Lincoln, but we’re also serving Lancaster County.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah.

Kim Goins:

So we’ve even started now putting some programming in place to go outside, even the city of Lincoln.

Lyn Wineman:

That’s great.

Kim Goins:

We will be the leader for youth development, specifically in the workforce space. We will be leading that conversation, we will be ensuring that young people here are connected with internships, and I think we’ll be able to really measure, Lyn, just the growth that our young people are having. And the way we’re going to measure that is, if that number is 50% now, of kids in poverty, how are we making sure that those families don’t continue those cycles of poverty?

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah.

Kim Goins:

And that’s what we’re here to measure. We believe in the next 15 years we will be leading that conversation.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh, that all sounds great. I have a suggestion for you too. I think you need to add an advertising program. We need some copywriters, and graphic designers, and web developers out there. So all right.

Kim Goins:

Let’s do it.

Lyn Wineman:

Fantastic. Fantastic. Kim, it is so inspirational to talk to you, and everybody who listens to the podcast knows I have one favorite question that I ask every guest. And that is that I would love a Kim Goins original motivational quote to share with our listeners. What do you have for us today?

Kim Goins:

Oh goodness. So the first thing that comes to mind for me, Lyn, is to always be in the process of building meaningful and authentic relationships, because they matter. Because they matter. But it has to be meaningful, and it has to be authentic. And I would definitely say give first. Give first. Yeah.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh, that’s great. Both of those are great. You gave us double, you gave us bonus, two quotes. I’m just going to say when your husband, Tony Goins was on, he only gave us one. So you have…

Kim Goins:

I always say he works hard; I’ll work smart.

Lyn Wineman:

I love it. I love it, I love it. So Kim, for our listeners today, who would really like to learn more about your work, how can they find out more about Boys & Girls Clubs of Lincoln Lancaster county?

Kim Goins:

Sure. Well, we are always looking for the community to get involved, and they can get involved in several ways. As a volunteer, as a donor, as a mentor, and full disclosure, my number is public, my email is public. Even if you see something, an industry come in this community, if you look at our program and, on our website, that we don’t have, I want to have those conversations, just like this copyright conversation, right?

Lyn Wineman:

Yes.

Kim Goins:

How do we implement that? But really Lyn, your audience can go to our website.

Lyn Wineman:

Okay.

Kim Goins:

It’s www.lincolnbgc- for boys and girls club- lincolnbgc.org. Please follow us on Facebook. We have lots of updates, great pictures of these cute faces, our outcomes are there, and that’s just Lincoln Boys & Girls Club. And you can also follow us on Instagram, and it’s the same. It’s the Boys & Girls Club of Lincoln there as well.

Lyn Wineman:

Fantastic. We’ll get all of those links in our show notes as well for anybody who didn’t catch it. So as we wrap up our time together today, what is the most important thing you would like our listeners to remember about the work that you’re doing, Kim?

Kim Goins:

Yeah. The most important thing is this. I’d like for the members, your listeners, to first just kind of look inward and think about what they want their legacy to be. Right? Because if you do that, what I really wants them to remember about our work is, one, how they got involved. So please get involved with the Boys & Girls Club, and again, there are many ways to do it. And if there’s something we’re not doing, feel free to give me a call or shoot me an email. And I think it’s important for them to know that we really are working hard to work ourselves out of a job.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah.

Kim Goins:

I would love the day that we can shutter this business, because collectively we’ve come together to take care of our own first, and right here in this community, that if support this community, support workforce development in this community, if not through the Boys & Girls Club, there are so many thriving and worthy nonprofits in Lincoln, Nebraska, specifically. Support them, in greater Lincoln, support the nonprofits. And most importantly, I want them to remember, that we are really changing generational lives. We are making sure that the kids now, that their grandkid’s grandkids will be better off than their start was.

Lyn Wineman:

Kim, that is just beautiful. And as we wrap up today, I just have to say, I really believe the world needs more people like you, more organizations like the Boys & Girls Clubs. And thank you for taking time to talk with us today.

Kim Goins:

Thank you for having me. I appreciate it. This has been a lot of fun.

Announcer:

We hope you enjoyed today’s Agency for Change podcast. To hear all our interviews with those who are making a positive change in our communities or to nominate a change maker you’d love to hear from, visit Kidglov.com at K-I-D-G-L-O-V.com to get in touch. As always, if you like what you’ve heard today, be sure to rate, review, subscribe, and share. Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time.

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