Agency for Change - Angie Kubicek, Director of Grown Marketing, Omaha Steaks » KidGlov

Announcer:

Welcome to Agency for Change, a podcast from KidGlov that brings you the stories of changemakers, who are actively working to improve our communities. In every episode, we’ll meet with people who are making a lasting impact in the places we call home.

Lyn Wineman:

Hi everyone. This is Lyn Wineman, president of KidGlov. Welcome to another episode of the Agency for Change podcast. Now you all know I’m in advertising and we’ve all heard that adage, “Sell the Sizzle, Not the Steak.” Well today’s guest does both. Angie Kubicek is the Director of Growth Marketing at Omaha Steaks, and she was also recently named the 2020 AMA Lincoln Marketer of the Year. Angie, congratulations, and welcome to the podcast.

Angie Kubicek:

Thank you so much for having me. I’m super excited to chat with you today.

Lyn Wineman:

I always love a good chat and let’s start with Omaha Steaks. One of Nebraska’s most well-known brands. Could you give our listeners a high-level overview of the company and even how it’s evolved over the years?

Angie Kubicek:

Yeah, so I think we’re very fortunate, right? We’re one of those brands everyone can roll it off the tongue. We were actually just on Family Feud. We were the number two answer of what’s most known in Omaha. It was Omaha, the city, or Omaha Steaks. It was a fun little brand moment for us, but, Omaha Steaks is actually celebrating our 104th anniversary right now, which is a huge cue for an Omaha company to be able to stay and we are still a family-owned business. We are still family-owned and operated. We’re in the fifth generation and they’re still involved. Which is a pretty cool thing to have within the ethos of a company as it is very family-feel oriented.

Angie Kubicek:

So, you fight with your family and you love your family, you bond with your family, and at work, you spend so much time with each other, you do become that family connection. And so there’s definitely that vibe throughout Omaha Steaks, but as it’s passed through the generations and who’s kind of running the ship, over the last year, the family really kind of wanted to take us into a new era of what is Omaha Steaks, right? We don’t want to just be your grandpa’s steak, which is I think what a lot of people tend to relate with our product and what we are as a brand, because we are such a legacy out there. And so we’ve really brought in a lot of fresh blood and new, innovative thinkers and idea makers and really kind of changing the way we operate to be more tech focused, really innovative in our processes, thinking about how do we become more sustainable as a brand and organization, and just truly pushing ourselves to always be the best.

Angie Kubicek:

And something we say in a lot of our meetings is that we’re never satisfied with the results and so that’s really become a mantra. And so everything we do we think how can we innovate, how can we make it better? And that’s really what’s been changing through Omaha Steaks. I probably will get emotional because he was a great man, but our CEO and, family founder, he passed away unexpectedly in February. I had only worked there since November. And you feel such a connection to him because he was a very fiery spirited person.

Angie Kubicek:

And Todd Simon, who is now our acting CEO, he stepped right back in to fill in the void, but this year has become this year that we’re like, we’re going to make Bruce proud because he loved everyone at Omaha Steaks. He loves the company so much. And it’s just when you have that connection with people who run this mega company like that. I thought was a really unique experience to be able to have and made it really endearing. So that’s kind of what Omaha Steaks is up to right now it’s just we’re really excited to continue to let new people experience our brand and to help just make that legacy live on for the family that cares so much.

Lyn Wineman:

I love so much about what you just said. I mean, it just feels great to be in a company that feels like a family, but it also makes me think back 104 years ago, like what would they even think if they walked into Omaha Steaks today and saw everything that you’re doing? So that’s a really cool thought, but congratulations on 104 years. I imagine one thing that’s changed too, is your title. I love your title, the Director of Growth Marketing. I’m just curious, Angie, what does your day-to-day look like and what are you focused on?

Angie Kubicek:

Yeah, so the day to day is ever evolving. It’s always changing. So my role specifically is tapped with bringing in a new audience base for Omaha Steaks. For a long time they’ve done a great job of a lot of organic growth to be really honest and they’ve lived on a lot of direct response principles within the framework of Omaha Steaks. That’s really the backbone of our company. And actually a lot of team members have a shirt that I still need to get, which is “I will mail you steaks” because that’s really how we grew the business.

Angie Kubicek:

So now my role is to leverage new technology and new channels to help us connect with a new audience. So connecting with those individuals who fall into our sweet spot of our demographics, but also introducing people to our brand at a little bit of a different kind of tier two audience for us to kind of pull them into Omaha Steaks. So that’s really what my focus is as my role in. So as Bruce, who I just spoke about, he told me on one of my last calls with him that I- he looked at myself and the Director of Customer Retention and Connection that we were like his daughters, because we loved to spend his money.

Angie Kubicek:

It was always a joke for us. We drive a lot of the ad spend and then that nurturing of that customer to make sure that they feel that connection to our brands. So I have a team that’s really focused on traditional marketing tactics and then those PR principles and then a new digital team that we’re really starting to build out within our walls to make sure that we are really following that customer journey or not following because it’s all over the map now, but making sure that we’re present and relevant where they’re at.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah. I do have to admit when it’s Christmas time or Thanksgiving time, or there’s a special event and you get an Omaha Steaks package delivered to your house or your office, that’s always like an amazing day. But I got to think that competition has to be really increasing. I mean, as technology changes for marketing, but also for shipping, I’ve got to imagine that your position is really working on getting out ahead of some of that competition.

Angie Kubicek:

Oh my gosh, yeah. The competition has just gotten more aggressive to be really frank, especially in the digital space because, right? That’s a more nimble approach and you can kind of ebb and flow based on your budgets and what you can bring in. But we have seen more players come into this space and then we’ve seen that typical non-contenders really kind of get aggressive. So the pandemic really adjusted people’s buying patterns over the last year. And so we now have a broader audience because people always thought of Omaha Steaks as a gift for the holidays or for Father’s Day. But then when the pandemic really reared its ugly head, it became, I need- there’s a shortage of beef and meat and I don’t feel safe going to the store, shoot. My city is shut down. I cannot go to the grocery store.

Angie Kubicek:

So we found a lot of people opting into Omaha Steaks because we could solve that problem for them in that need. And so where my other opportunity is for our brand is making sure that people realize that even though the world is, I will cautiously say, starting to open up, speak too soon, right? And we’re going to be saying this is outdated, but as we kind of even go through the Delta variant, we are this option, but grocery stores changed their models and how they supported pre-order your groceries through deliveries. They expanded their footprint of where deliveries were allowed to go. And so that then created another new layer of competition for us over this last year that we absolutely are looking at.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah. Angie, I was talking with another marketer who was very excited and said, “Hey, one of the great things about the pandemic is we now are opened to a greater geographic area.” But then as we talked, there was this realization. It means that all of our competitors are now open to our geographic area as well. So double edge sword there.

Angie Kubicek:

It is. And with like the Delta variant picking up again, it’s going to be a different ball game for us to play in because now consumers kind of understand where they’re comfortable, they understand how to navigate what their normal looks like. And so we need to make sure that we’re providing them an experience and an offering that makes them think that was the solution during, for my life that made it convenient and easy and awesome. And it brought me joy. And so we just need to make sure we keep delivering on that promise.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah absolutely. As you talk about experience, I know a lot of your customer experience has moved to your website. And one thing I noticed on the website is this line that says, “committed to delivering the very best.” And I know that really speaks to the quality of the food, but I’m wondering if it applies to your department as well. I mean, how does that relate to your team’s work?

Angie Kubicek:

Oh my gosh. Yeah. So that’s it goes back to our mantra of as a group, our CMO, Julie Evans, is always like, we’re never satisfied. We always want to think, how can we do a better job? We’ve hit the mark, we’ve exceeded a goal, which is awesome. And we celebrate, but for us as a team, there’s always something we can think of differently and be considerate of. And so for us, it’s really making sure that we are being those detailed oriented team members and making sure that we’re thinking things through. So we’re, as an organization, have historically been very siloed in how we approached marketing direct mail, didn’t relate to what was happening in email and that didn’t relate to what we were doing in search. And so as the website has become a bigger player for us in our mobile site or mobile experiences. 

Angie Kubicek:

Now the dominant player for us, really making sure that we have that connected experience and bringing it all together. So it’s how we nest to make sure we have a really collaborative team so that we were cognizant of what offers do we have out there? How was their promo strategy and pricing and how is that helping make our customer’s lives easier? And honestly, one of the ways that we’ve doubled down as much as website is really key and pinnacles to our success, we still have a really strong call in audience. And so we listened to calls every week. What are pain points? Why did they call in? What do they love about our products and packages and our assortment value? And then how do we make sure we’re making that then flip into our marketing presence that we have out there. So we don’t make it this, like, confusing experience.

Angie Kubicek:

And then the other thing, the team is really trying to make sure that we commit to is giving them that best collaboration and partnership. So I’ve just bought this amazing steak. How do I make sure it cooks so well at home? How do we make sure that we’re providing them the tools, the recipes, and that follow through experience that makes them think well, that was worth it because it was not only the best steak of my life, but I actually can prepare it at home, which is one of my biggest fears for customers.

Lyn Wineman:

Confidence building, right? Yeah.

Angie Kubicek:

So yeah, so that the team really has to think through that mindset a lot. So every day we’re challenging, the results, the KPIs. Are we getting our ROAS targets out of this? Is this giving us our payback window that we’re looking for? Is this being judicious to our company? Because the investment we make today, we wanted it to have that future pay off for the business. So we think about all of that with every single transaction we make in advertising. So that way we’re really making sure when I acquire that customer, they are going to stick around for the next three to five years.

Lyn Wineman:

So Angie, I know this was just an example, when you say, Hey, when I pick up the phone and order a steak, but I am curious when you place your own order for yourself or your family, what are your favorite things from Omaha Steaks to order?

Angie Kubicek:

Oh my gosh. So I mean, we’re famous for our filets. I will have to say we have a proprietary pet. We have our butchers cut lineup. We actually did a lot of product integration in this last year because we really wanted to make sure we were delivering on that great first customer experience for a lot of people who met us during the pandemic. And so our butcher’s cut filet is by far one of the most buttery steaks you’ll ever have. You can cut it with a fork, a butter knife at home. You don’t have to go to chef’s house to get that done. Absolutely a must have in your kitchen. I really like the rib eye. I don’t really care about the calorie count sometimes when I make a steak at home. And so our crown rib eye is by far the most buttery steak you’ll ever have in your life. And then our caramel apple tartlets are the next dessert in the world. I literally just had a shipment come to my house today, maybe, and I may have ordered a bunch for my daughter’s birthday.

Lyn Wineman:

I love it. I love it. I love it. I’m adding them all to my list. That’s fantastic.

Angie Kubicek:

I will say the car- and it’s nice because everything’s like individually packed. So if you’re working at home, we can cook up a salmon or filet right at home and you don’t have to like get out the entire box or package and it’s all flash frozen right away. So you don’t have to worry about it like decaying and then not having it at that peak moment. So I’m spoiled. And so now has my husband who I think–

Lyn Wineman:

I imagine your whole family is spoiled with that menu online. So Angie, there’s such a sense of pride. And you mentioned this at the beginning. I mean, to be a Jeopardy question or a Family Feud question.

Angie Kubicek:

Family Feud. I mean, we’ve been in Jeopardy as well, but family feud it’s fun.

Lyn Wineman:

That’s pretty cool. To hear Steve Harvey utter your name has to be pretty good. So, but there’s a real sense of pride of people who live in Omaha or people even who live in Nebraska when they hear Omaha Steaks mentioned outside of the state. I mean, just knowing that that your company is important to the community. How would you say Omaha Steaks gives back to the community?

Angie Kubicek:

The community is at the heart of Omaha Steaks. It’s definitely at the heart of our family, quite a bit that we have. And so, I mean, since they’ve been around, they’ve been a huge philanthropist within our community. They give to a lot of our arts programs in Omaha, to really honest, which a lot of times I’ve held the seat where you have to choose who are you going to give back to it just like sometimes the worst seat at the table, because you just want to give it to everybody, but you- so there’s a lot of like at that brand alignment and for us it’s we want to make sure that Omaha is that destination city, that we have this amazing place to call home. That it’s an attractive place for talent to come and live and raise a family.

Angie Kubicek:

And so making sure we’re supporting the arts and the zoo and our athletic venues around our community is a big part of Omaha Steaks and something that we’re really proud of and a part of. And we make sure that, actually, our team members get to go experience it. So just as in something that when you’re a sponsor, you have the C-suite gets the benefit. So we make sure that any team member has access to be able to receive sometimes the benefits of being a supporter of the different venues within our community, but a big supporter of the arts. But then another one we picked up over the last couple of years, just to Feeding America just seemed like a really natural brand alignment for us. It’s a nationwide organization, but something that is very supported within the Omaha community. And then the last one we just engaged in, as a national brand, we wanted to make sure that we were doing something that also kind of would connect with any customer that we have.

Angie Kubicek:

And so Mercy Chefs is a recent affiliation that we picked up and what they do is they go to where there’s a natural disaster and they have chefs like real trained, classically trained chefs prepare these amazing meals for the first responders and the victims and the supporters within that community. And so we provide meals to those chefs and the food. So that way they can make amazing gourmet who are really working hard. So when there was that really unfortunate tragedy at that condo in Miami, we were there with them helping to make sure that they had amazing food to be able to prepare for those working around the clock to find survivors.

Lyn Wineman:

I like that strategy. I have never heard of that. You said Mercy Chefs?

Angie Kubicek:

Yeah. They are a 501(c)(3). Yeah. And they go, they go all around the country. And so they just kind of go and find where there’s this moment. It’s a new partnership for Omaha Steaks and we’re really excited to help them in their mission.

Lyn Wineman:

That’s fantastic. Great food can be so comforting, especially in a time of crisis. So Angie, I’d love to know what’s one thing that most people don’t know about Omaha Steaks?

Angie Kubicek:

One thing that people don’t know about Omaha Steaks, gosh, I’m trying to think about like our hidden secrets that we have, but I honestly will say that we have amazing seafood. I think people are always astounded when I tell them that some of my favorite food is our seafood. It is the freshest that you can get we have amazing teams that go out and they source the food and then it’s frozen right there. And so it comes to your home, just, it tastes so good. You can almost like smell saltwater and I’m not being dramatic. I swear. It’s true. I also just had a shipment of salmon burgers and, for my breakfast in the morning, today, I literally just had a package show up like an hour ago. And so we have some of the best seafood. And I think people are always amazed by that because we’re in Nebraska and the Midwest and we’re called Omaha Steaks.

Angie Kubicek:

But that is probably something that people from like the food side, when I’m always like ordering seafood, that they think I’m crazy. And then I would say, actually, on the employee side, they have as company really dedicated to making it a more modern and innovative workplace. And so really trying to make sure we treat everyone like family and they say why that’s surprising and then known as, because I think especially if you’re from the Omaha and Lincoln area, you hear Omaha Steaks, if you’ve worked at all in our communities, you’re like, oh, that’s like an old school company. And they had a lot of rigor and structure. And about a year ago, they really kind of started to change up who was at the helm of some different departments and just bringing in those fresh perspectives and so dedicated into leadership development and team development, but then investing in families.

Angie Kubicek:

So literally we get these emails and just like two hours ago, there was one kind of noting that we have this family scholarship program. So if I have a kid who’s about to graduate from high school, they can apply to get a scholarship for their college credits. And so just little things like that are just really fun perks that I still every day kind of discover new ones. Because I’ve only worked here since November.

Angie Kubicek:

But I think that’s also probably something that’s like a quiet gem about working at Omaha Steaks is there are a lot of family benefits for us that I don’t think it’s talked about, because again, it used to be a very, like, nine to five in the office. And you sat at your cube and you were here and you did not leave and now we’ve thrived during a pandemic. So we’re like, yes, we can do this from home. We can have flexible. We can take a little bit of that. And so they’ve really kind of doubled down on focusing on team development over the last year, which has been really cool to be a part of kind of some of that growth and change I love.

Lyn Wineman:

Hearing that you referenced this in the beginning, but we spend so much time at work that just when you’re in a culture that’s really strong and really supportive and on a team that you love working with it just improves your life and improves the way you show up for your family and your friends. And I think there’s so many good things about that.

Angie Kubicek:

Just like with any family, right? You have your good days and you have your bad days. But like what I love about and I have to say a lot of places I’ve been at, if there’s that intention to become that like no one’s ever that perfect organization, a lot of people have the schtick out there. People are like, Ooh, that’s the best place then you talked to a team member and they were like, no, it sucks working here. So everyone has those like skeletons in their closet, but something I’ve- it’s been fun to be a part of is getting to that like refresh like intention for being better.

Lyn Wineman:

So Angie let’s focus on you a little bit. You were recognized by the American Marketing Association of Lincoln as their 2020 Marketer of the Year, which is a pretty cool deal. Can you tell us just a bit more about your career in marketing and what this recognition means to you? I know you’re very humble and you don’t like talking about yourself, so I’m going to ask you to do it anyway.

Angie Kubicek:

Okay. I think for me, it’s just I think I said it in my AMA video that I think a lot of marketers by nature are kind of self-deprecating human beings that we like to put other things on the spotlight. And it’s something that I will say you work really hard as a marketer. My husband is a mechanical engineer and we joke about how there is a lot of elbow grease that goes into marketing. And so many people think it’s this fluffy easy job. And so I know marketers work their asses off to be successful and to make their clients successful or their company successful.

Angie Kubicek:

And so for me, it was just a recognition that the work I was doing was valuable to people or that my team thought I was a good enough team leader to be like, yeah, I support her or that somebody thought, you know what? I like her work enough and how she operates within the office to even to nominate her for this award. To me, that was probably the part that like speaks the most to me, is that someone not- you have to be nominated for that. And to be nominated, I thought was really special for me. So that just means with where I’ve tracked in my career and the different challenges I’ve taken on and opportunities that they were the right moves and the right bets and that it was recognized. And I think that does feel good at the end of the day, even though the public side of the recognition sometimes mortifies me, but it’s kind of cool to see.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah. I think it’s really cool. I think it’s a great honor and well, well-deserved. Now one thing you mentioned how hard we work. I think during the pandemic, a lot of marketers, we even had to ratchet it up more because everything changed so quickly and you received this award during the pandemic. And I’m just curious a lot of companies had to pivot what impact did COVID play for Omaha Steaks?

Angie Kubicek:

I would say, what didn’t it impact? But really, like, it changed our product supply. It changed our pricing strategy because we had to control demand so we could have supply and then have to have sell out their other competitors of ours who had to go dark for like six months, which was insane. And so our goal was to be able to always offer something. And we had a really smart sourcing team who got like, made sure we had product lined up so we could get through it those first few months. We did have sell outs, but we always had, okay, this is out, here’s what else you could get that’s like this product. And then it changed our marketing. We’re in the midst of overhauling, our marketing partners and strategies at that moment. And when everything in March kind of went crazy. And so it, we were in one creative media and then two days later we’re like, scratch that.

Angie Kubicek:

We’re going to go to stock up and we have what you need message. And I say that as if I was there in that moment, but the team did an amazing job of pivoting. And I think like most companies went to a remote work from home status. We have a huge telemarketing team and call center group that does a phenomenal job of taking those calls from our customers. All of that went remote, which was a very big shift for our business. And so that’s going to be a mainstay for us because we have found, we’ve gotten really quality customer service representatives who can manage those calls better than if you have to be in an office space to do that work. So then we changed our investment strategy with how we did our marketing. Instead of pulling back, we leaned in quite a bit up there spending a lot of the different projects and channels that we were activating within.

Angie Kubicek:

Just so that way we could let people know we have an ample supply. We can get through this moment with you. And we did. And it really worked out well for Omaha Steaks that you always hate to say it, but that pandemic, it really helped our team get laser focused on how to run a really well-oiled ship, where we had a lot of change happening. We had new leadership coming in and then the team was in the process of our already augmenting our product line, but it made them have to go faster because we want to keep your experience the best, right? We want them to have the best cuts of meats. We want them to have the right size of product coming up, right? That cooler experience, you order, people are in a pandemic. They’re scared, they’re stressed. They can’t go out to a nice restaurant anymore.

Angie Kubicek:

How do we make sure when they get that cooler at their doorstep, that they have that like, I’m so excited, it’s here and you open it. And it’s like a full cooler and it feels great. And you’re like, that was worth every penny in my investment, or that was worth the four day wait or two day wait, whatever it may be, but depending on locations. And so that took a lot of coordination to make sure we dialed that in the right way. So, and it in a way into your business model, because again, we were very gift-oriented business with sell self buying throughout the year. But now I would say like, we have continued and maintained our pathing of people went to Omaha Steaks for themselves and they’ve stayed. And so it’s really kind of adjusted how we speak to our customer base now.

Lyn Wineman:

That is great. That is great. So Angie thinking about all of this, like your career, your experience, your experience at Omaha Steaks. What advice do you have for leaders who want to make a difference?

Angie Kubicek:

I would say you really have to have a gut belief in yourself and know kind of what the direction you want to go. And if you are convicted in that, you can kind of thrive anywhere you go. Because it’s going to be your North Star. And so if you want to make a difference, you need to make sure that you work for people that are open to a conversation. And that in front of me was the biggest part of any change I’ve made within my career. And so that’s two part, right? To have a conversation you have to speak and listen. And so for me, in my early moves, I was making changes in my career because I was wanting to learn and understand things that I like before I was running display campaigns and I’ll never forget Yahoo, where we operated campaigns, that they understood the technology powering them.

Angie Kubicek:

And so it was a very different world, but I learned a lot about what it takes to actually set up and to function as the ad platform for advertisers. And then went and worked for some really colossal brands when I was at Bailey Lauerman, which was a phenomenal experience. And so I got to really understand the different dynamics of some really kind of tier one brands in my mind and got a slew of experiences there that I felt gave me a lot of the confidence I needed to be able to go and take on that, like some in-house roles where I did. And so once you have those convictions, then you can be confident in your voice and start to have, I think, stronger conversations with leadership to impact how they do their communication, their marketing, but also how they then impacted the community.

Angie Kubicek:

And I worked for Firespring in Lincoln. And I will say I took a lot away from that role of working with Jay and with the team there, because he has such a strong conviction for giving back to your community. And a lot of companies will say, oh, times are getting tough so we should cut this budget. And he looks at connection to community as like a non-negotiable. It is a fixed. If you think about it as it, your budget, it is a fixed line on your budget and it doesn’t go away. That is you can’t have that be something that you just cut when times get hard, because that’s when your community needs it most. And so, kind of, I took that away from that role and that learning with him, because then you can take that and have that strong voice and that confidence and your next role, which is now for me in Omaha Steaks, like we’ve had a lot of fortitude as a company. And so, we are now we’ve expanded how we’re giving back and connecting and thinking about what does this mean to our team members and their families and the experiences they get to have within the society we’re in. And so it’s just an important part to help you kind of level up in those conversations.

Lyn Wineman:

That is great advice. And I appreciate how you linked it back to your journey along the way. And so Angie, one thing people who listened to this podcast know is that I am inspired by motivational quotes. And I ask everyone I talk to to give us a few of their own words of wisdom. So you are officially on the hot seat. Can you give me an Angie Kubicek quote that we can use?

Angie Kubicek:

Sure. So within my team, I tell them all the time that the Everest of expectations will always exist. Tackling them all at once is not feasible. So we need to find our summits and that’s how we’ll gauge success.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh, I love that so much.

Angie Kubicek:

That’s kind of how we are on track for the- I mean, that’s driving how we operate this year as a team is that we set some big bets for ourselves as a team on what we’re going to accomplish. And to say getting to the peak is the only way we’ve had success is not a scalable expectation. And so we’ve set ourselves our summits of how we’re going to get there. And then how, how did we do getting there? Did we get to that third summit that’s success in its own, right? Because it’s a lot of new for Omaha Steaks. So that’s kind of how we’re approaching, getting through at least this year and then how we’ll approach next year.

Lyn Wineman:

That’s a great quote. And just great general advice, a gem there for sure. So to bring this full circle, let’s actually talk about steaks. Actually, we’ve talked about the steaks and the seafood and the apple tartlets. That’s quite a bit and anybody who’s not hungry, I don’t know what is wrong with them, but–

Angie Kubicek:

I have to have snacks in my office because otherwise I am like hangry by the end of the day. Or I’ll have to go to Chef Spacey and beg her to make me our cookies.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh gosh. Now you’re into cookies. All right. For our listeners who would like to learn more about Omaha Steaks, maybe join the team, maybe place an order. How do they find more?

Angie Kubicek:

Yeah. The fastest route to success would be to go to Omahasteaks.com and shop. We have a lot of pre-made packages for people. So make it easy to kind of have your first experience with Omaha Steaks. And then if you’re looking for a career change, we are hiring across the board right now, like crazy. Like I think most people are, but in the footer there, you can find our career opportunities. Or if you go to LinkedIn and connect with our HR recruiters or really any team member there in are happy to help point you in the right direction. But yeah, right now we’re an expanding team. So always looking for any marketing team members, merchandisers, creators, so…

Lyn Wineman:

Fantastic. All right, peeps, who are looking for a new career, check out Omaha Steaks and order some cookies and salmon and steaks while you’re there. Angie, as we wrap up our time together today, what is the most important thing you would like our listeners to remember about the work that you’re doing?

Angie Kubicek:

I think what I want people just to remember is that get the learnings, get your convictions, and then forge ahead. You create your destiny. No one’s going to hand it to you. So that’s what I’ve learned a lot through my career. It’s what I’m learning as I navigate helping Omaha Steaks for a new customers. So that on yourself, believe in yourself and you’ll get there

Lyn Wineman:

Amen to that. Angie, I fully believe the world needs more people like you. So thank you for taking the time to talk with us today.

Angie Kubicek:

Thanks for having me. This was fun.

Lyn Wineman:

It was fun. All right. Thanks a lot.

Announcer:

We hope you enjoy today’s agency for change podcast. To hear all our interviews with those who are making a positive change in our communities or to nominate a change maker. You’d love to hear from visit kid glove dot com@kidglov.com to get in touch as always, if you like what you’ve heard today, be sure to rate, review, subscribe, and share. Thanks for listening. And we’ll see you next time.

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