Agency for Change- Christie Hinrichs, President & CEO, Tabitha » KidGlov

Announcer:

Welcome to Agency for Change, a podcast from KidGlov that brings you the stories of changemakers who are actively working to improve our communities. In every episode, we’ll meet with people who are making a lasting impact in the places we call home.

Lyn Wineman:

Hi everyone. This is Lyn Wineman, president of KidGlov. I’m starting today with a word association game. What comes to mind when you hear the two words “old age,” or what about “gray hair,” or “senior citizen?” Hmm. While you ponder that, I’ll let you know that our guest today, Christie Hinrichs, president and CEO of Tabitha, an innovative organization serving seniors, has actually done a Ted Talk on just this topic and how she believes the current one size fits all healthcare system needs to be disrupted.

Lyn Wineman:

Christie, welcome to the podcast.

Christie Hinrichs:

Oh, thank you for having me. It’s so great to be with you and have this opportunity to talk about my passion, I guess.

Lyn Wineman:

Absolutely, Christie you and I have known each other for a while and we could talk all day couldn’t we? But we’ll make this less than all day. So let’s start with your Ted Talk. Because I have seen it, it was so powerful. But would you share how you are positively disrupting the industry. Let’s start by having you give us the high-level overview of the organization you lead.

Christie Hinrichs:

Oh sure, thank you. So, Tabitha is about 135 years old, right? So we’ve done a lot of things over those 135 years, but I would say the best way to describe our history and our present is: Within the communities that we serve, we always ask ourselves, what are the gaps that need attention? Can we fill those gaps in a way that presents an expertise and a commitment? What we want to make sure we do is serve seniors in their families in an exceptional way. We want to be a great community collaborator, and we do want to make sure that we can bring innovation to those gaps. So we have actually, and a lot of people don’t know this, we’ve expanded into about 27 counties-

Lyn Wineman:

Wow.

Christie Hinrichs:

Over time, right. Again, that’s been by invitation. So small communities come together and they realize we don’t have some healthcare places that allow us to age in our own communities and stay in our own homes where we’ve raised our families.

Christie Hinrichs:

They’ve reached out to us and said, “Is this something you’d be willing to do?” I’m so proud of the work that we do both in the city of Lincoln and Lancaster County, but also in all these small communities. Because I’m a rural kid so committed to helping people find ways to just stay in their own communities and help them be prosperous throughout time.

Christie Hinrichs:

I think you mentioned it, Tabitha, we provide a full continuum of aging services. So our skilled nursing facility at 48th and Randolph is what people I think, think of us most. But sometimes people think of us as the old nursing home. We’re definitely not.

Lyn Wineman:

Not that.

Speaker 3:

Not that, but we provide skilled rehab for people who maybe have discharged from the hospital and just need a little strengthening, et cetera, to make their way back home, which is great, an area of expertise for us. We do provide long-term care. And you know this, we were the first in the nation to bring greenhouses, which are small houses where long-term care, really heavy care, older adults, seniors live. But we are… They’re licensed as a nursing home in small environments, make them thrive in ways that larger environments cannot. Then our expertise in home health care and hospice and I’m passionate about both of those. Again, keeping people in their own homes, walking with people at an in-flight journey, assisted living, we’re expanding into Grand Island and building a community there with independent living, assisted living, and again, small house services.

Speaker 3:

We have communities in Crete and we have communities in south Lincoln and we are also probably known for our Meals on Wheels program-

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah.

Christie Hinrichs:

Which was… Has been significant for a very long time in terms of helping people, 500 a day, stay home. Yeah, because their nutritional needs are met. I will tell you that’s 100% volunteer powered. So how proud can Lincoln be that together we’ve provided this service. During COVID, it mattered more than ever, and it’s always mattered. But just knowing that during COVID that we could continue to provide food and some sort of connection with people. So anyway, I could obviously go on and on because we’ve been around for a long time, but also I’m just passionate about the work that we do and the team members who do it.

Lyn Wineman:

Absolutely. So many good things that you mentioned the word continuum. I’ve heard you tell this story before, but can you give us an example of how someone might actually use several of Tabitha services throughout their aging journey?

Christie Hinrichs:

Yeah. The thing is, is that it’s really hard to navigate health care or some sort of supportive services. The lingo we use is bizarre and clinical and foreign. You’ve got advice coming from so many people.

Lyn Wineman:

Mm-hmm.

Christie Hinrichs:

So what will happen is, we’ll get a call from someone who knows that they need some sort of assistance for themselves or for a parent or grandparent, which by the way, the adult daughter is most often the decision maker, so connecting with her, which means you and I, right?

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah.

Christie Hinrichs:

We’ve done this.

Lyn Wineman:

We’re the ones.

Christie Hinrichs:

They call and they know they need something, but often they don’t know what they need, or they may have even been told by someone what they need. But as we listen, and this goes back to the Ted Talk, as we listen, we may be able to help them identify that it’s actually a different resource that would help them be most successful. Sometimes Tabitha is the answer for that resource. Sometimes we’re not, but that’s where community collaboration comes in places. We know our community resources well, whatever community we serve in. So we’ll help connect seniors to those services if that’s right then. Now I’ve really not answered your question, which as you know, is not unusual for me. 

Christie Hinrichs:

Circling back to it, circling back to it, right?

Christie Hinrichs:

So, what often happens is, let’s just go back to skilled rehab. We may have someone who was hospitalized and had some sort of surgery or something and needed a little additional support to help them be successful or returning to home. So they may come to Tabitha, 48th and Randolph, and do that. We send them home. They may do great for a very long time. Maybe then there’s another hospitalization. This time they could transition successfully back home with our home health care expertise. We just help strengthen them in their own home, which is awesome.

Christie Hinrichs:

Then, they may very well reach the point in which end of life is where they’re at and they don’t want to continue fighting or doing extraordinary measures. So then our hospice is the solution for them. Just that relationship of knowing whatever I need, Tabitha is a one-stop shop, we’ve developed relationships, trusting relationships with them. So I call and they help us identify. We don’t know what we need sometimes. But if Tabitha is a careful listener, we always intend to be together, we’ll find those solutions.

Lyn Wineman:

I really appreciate that because it is healthcare. It is the aging journey, which for many of us Is difficult. Talk about, we want to do the best for ourselves and our family. The fact that you’re navigating people through, I think, is really impressive.

Lyn Wineman:

Now, Christie, I know you have recently redefined Tabitha’s purpose statement. Can you share that statement and how it impacts all of the work that you’re doing?

Christie Hinrichs:

Yeah. For our listeners could see, right, my big smile. Our mission matters. Our mission previously was so much about caring for seniors and with Christian compassion and just empowering seniors. So as my board and my team members talk through that, we decided that is really something that people should just expect of Tabitha. It’s something people should expect of Tabitha. We… That is our internal commitment. It is a promise that we live. So, in order for us to help do our part, to change the view of aging, we wrestled around with a lot of words, like what could we give up? What are we not willing to give up? I’ll just give a shout out to a couple of board members who’ve been with me for a long time, Lisa Smith and Kimberly Wrath.

Christie Hinrichs:

They both were adult daughters going through this aging journey with loved ones. Both of them kept using the word joy. In some cases, the absence of joy, right?

Lyn Wineman:

Mm-hmm.

Christie Hinrichs:

In that aging journey. So joy just kept sticking with us and coming back to the conversation. What we want to do is two things. We want society to realize there’s so much value still in older adults, whether they’re 65 and still working or 95 and still has so much wisdom to pass on. But also we want older adults to believe themselves that they have something to contribute, right? So our new purpose statement, which isn’t that new now, but it is: “We empower people to live joyfully and age gratefully.” And every word was chosen. Just every single word mattered. Why didn’t we say empower people, because it is also about the whole family unit, right?

Christie Hinrichs:

That somehow embraces even though today is frustrating and overwhelming navigating this. There is still joy in this relationship with a parent or a loved one that we got to pause and just celebrate, right?

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah.

Christie Hinrichs:

For seniors to wake up and be grateful for waking up instead of not being grateful for waking up. So when you live joyfully, then you can age gratefully. You can again be grateful for another day and another opportunity to contribute. So we got to engage seniors in a way that they are able to contribute in meaningful ways. We got to be intentional about that.

Lyn Wineman:

I love that every word of that was intentionally and passionately crafted. I think that’s so good. I have to give a shout out to Lisa Smith who was on an earlier episode of this podcast. Kim Rathe’s daughter McKinsey was on as well. So, wonderful leaders in this community.

Lyn Wineman:

So Christie, let’s take this back to the Ted Talk. I read some words at the beginning of this podcast because I was repeating the words I heard you say at the beginning of that Ted Talk. Can you talk more about how Tabitha is positively disrupting senior living?

Christie Hinrichs:

Right. So, one of the things that we are guilty of in healthcare is again, talking a lingo that is boring to people. We also talk about people by diagnosis or room number. Until you put a face on the person in which you’ve been called to care for, it’s really easy to have a separation for thinking of a person as an old one lady or an old man, right? So what we’ve been really intentional with in our culture at Tabitha, first, is to break bad habits like that. We weren’t not well-intended, it’s just a habit.

Lyn Wineman:

Right.

Christie Hinrichs:

You know, this is what we do. This is what we do in healthcare. Some of it is… There are settings in which you have to protect privacy. So there are times where, that is what it is, but there are a lot of times where you got to check yourself before you have an interaction. Lyn Wineman has a face and a history and a future. I got to make sure that that is what our interaction is about. So, a lot of, in terms of being disruptive, being innovative, started internally. I had the privilege to serve on a national board, our national board that represents aging services for the last six plus years. We went through some real work that was around what influence do we at a national level have the ability and responsibility to make? We made bringing ageism, it’s like one of the isms that isn’t talked about, right?

Lyn Wineman:

Right.

Christie Hinrichs:

–To light, to bring to people’s attention that as a society, we really do get annoyed with older people, right? We walk past someone who’s not walking fast enough.

Lyn Wineman:

Mm-hmm.

Christie Hinrichs:

We honk at someone who’s not driving fast enough, we look past and over people. We’re creating habits and bringing to other people’s attention that it’s not okay, number one. If we do not intentionally start engaging both seniors and the rest of society in a way where we each stop, change old habits, and look to seniors for the value in which they still have to create. Now, what is hardest, and I guess disruptive in and of itself is, older adults themselves convince themselves that they are no longer of value, right? Because society has pressed that for their whole lifetimes. So you have to start with helping them realize that they have so much still to contribute. It’s really being allowed voice, which you know me, I am a loud voice. But-

Lyn Wineman:

I appreciate that about you.

Christie Hinrichs:

Yeah, but being just unapologetic about that, and kind of bringing to people’s attention because we don’t even know we do it. I do it Lyn and I’m passionate about it. So, I think we have some things in our future as well that are just building. I wish I could talk more about it. Soon the world will know, but again, it is saying if we’re going to be committed and passionate about this, how does we say and everything we do embrace it so that we continue to influence people in little ways and big ways. To just allow people at whatever age to live joyfully and age gratefully.

Lyn Wineman:

Christie, it really just occurs to me as you say that with the social wakening in the past year-

Christie Hinrichs:

Yes. A lot of us are focusing on diversity, equity, and inclusion programs. A lot of us are focusing on unconscious bias, right? When you go through those exercises, you don’t think of age as being one of those groups, but it truly, truly is. It’s okay to say the phrase, okay boomer, right? But it really shouldn’t be, that just continues to push that narrative so.

Lyn Wineman:

So Christie, I know you have a lot of projects in the works. Some that you can’t talk about. Are there any that you would like to talk about today?

Christie Hinrichs:

Sure. I mean, we again… I think what we are really working hard on is being in communication with other healthcare support providers within the community to say let’s not duplicate efforts. What can we do together? So that’s important and especially in this environment where everyone has a staff shortage, right? Even outside of healthcare-

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah.

Christie Hinrichs:

Senior care. 

Lyn Wineman:

It feels like every industry, every.

Christie Hinrichs:

Absolutely, right? Technology is going to change our future. So we have to not feel like competitors any longer. We can do better than that in Lincoln, Nebraska, or Nebraska in general. So one of the things that this isn’t, front page of the newspaper. But one of the things that me and my team members are committed to is, leading the way in our community for those conversations to lead to the operations. We have to, we don’t have a choice. So we can either sit around and wait for a bigger disaster to happen, or we can lead the way in some innovative thoughts around that. Also, I mentioned this a little bit. We were invited to the Grand Island community, which we have served Hall County for a very long time with our home care and our hospice. Our reputation has been built there as trusted and extraordinary providers of services there. But the new hospital there at Prairie Commons on the south side of Grand Island, the leaders of that hospital as they were under construction, they really wanted to be sure that they had a plan for partners as they open their doors.

Christie Hinrichs:

So they did approach Tabitha based on our reputation and just said, can you be our preferred providers as it relates to service for seniors. So we’re building our first ever full continuum on one campus on that campus. So we’re next door neighbors to the hospital where the living, ability to move from one level of support to the next is right there. So again, it’s independent living and then assisted living and small houses that can provide both rehab and return you to home or long-term care. That’s the home that you need to live in. It’s beautiful. It’s exciting. The community of Grand Island has been perhaps one of the most welcoming communities we’ve ever gone in. I’m so grateful for that. It’s been a joy to start that work.

Lyn Wineman:

What an honor to be invited too, right?

Christie Hinrichs:

Yeah.

Lyn Wineman:

Not to just decide. Hey, it’s a market advantage. We can do it. Let’s go do it. You were invited-

Christie Hinrichs:

Yeah.

Lyn Wineman:

I think that speaks volumes.

Christie Hinrichs:

Yeah. We continue… Healthcare is changing, right? We continue to be invited into communities that see that there is movement away from their communities to the larger urban cities because solutions don’t exist in their communities. So we continue to expand our home health and hospice in just some more rural communities. But you’ll probably see us even move into some more of the urban communities as there continues to be changes in players and in who’s providing care. The communities that are just really committed to seeing long-term non-profit providers with expertise be who they want to partner with. You’ll see us kind of take on some more of those opportunities when they’re presented to us. Lincoln’s campus has some really exciting things coming around the corner that we’ll be announcing this fall. When we ultimately let that news out, it will be a one of a kind, first in the nation as well.

Christie Hinrichs:

So, we love listening to seniors and they tell us what life needs to look like different. If we can do it, we’re going to try to do it. I will just say this, with this work that’s underway, our primary advisors have been over the age of 80.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh that’s great.

Christie Hinrichs:

One of the closest advisers is 98 years old. In some ways this was an unintentional outcome that was a result of our work. Those who are engaged with us, their purpose to just wait and look forward to the day, because they have new ways to contribute-

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah.

Christie Hinrichs:

Has been remarkable. In fact, my friend who is 98, he said, “I believe God has kept me on this earth for this work.”

Lyn Wineman:

Oh my goodness. That just gives me goosebumps.

Christie Hinrichs:

I’m of course, nearly in tears, but that comes easy.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah, oh, that’s fantastic. So you’re obviously very passionate about serving and advocating for seniors. Have you always been this way? I’d love to hear Christie, more about your journey. I’m picturing eight-year-old Christie on a playground somewhere advocating for seniors.

Christie Hinrichs:

I think eight-year-old Christie was really a problem. Then I think 18-year-old Christie was really a problem.

Christie Hinrichs:

I don’t think Christie had a real plan. 15-year-old Christie worked at the local nursing home in Callaway, Nebraska, where I grew up. But I just needed money when it was a place to work.

Christie Hinrichs:

I don’t remember thinking that that was what I wanted to do when I grew up. Actual bachelor’s degrees in social work. The only reason I chose that is because I happened to be in a class that I was inspired by the professor. Cause I just don’t… No idea what I wanted to be when I grew up. By the time I graduated from college, I decided I wanted to be a probation officer.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh, a probation officer. Very different from what you’re doing now.

Christie Hinrichs:

Very different, so right? I did not have a passion for seniors. I laugh about the fact that Tabitha hired me first as a hospice social worker, because I do not remember knowing it, however old I was 21, while hospice even was. So somehow, I made it through that interview by the grace of God, I guess. But starting my life in hospice has formed who I am today. What a way to get started, right? What a way to recognize seniors, families, that very precious journey, and the privilege of being invited to be a part of that. So I’ve been taught core values and wisdom, my whole life and career at Tabitha. I love leading and inspiring and innovating. My work at Tabitha has allowed me to do that. I have been trusted. People have trusted in me more than I’ve trusted in myself at times. My young Christie was just making her way and learning along the way. Right?

Christie Hinrichs:

So people just kept putting their arms around me and teaching me and trusting me. When your work is that day after day, and you realize day after day, how underrepresented and how underappreciated seniors are, it’s impossible to not grow passionate, and just be a strong voice. As I always say, sometimes if I have to bully my way to the bar, again, it’s unapologetically because it’s for the right reasons. It’s because I see that seniors are being underrepresented and at a time in which they should be considered first.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah. Great. That’s great. You mentioned that you love to lead and inspire, and I know you have been recognized both locally and nationally for being a bold and innovative leader. Christie, how did you develop this skillset?

Christie Hinrichs:

I don’t know. I’ll just repeat again, people have seen something in me that I was unable to see for myself for many, many years. So, I think finally, a few people in my ear saying it over and over forces you to kind of accept the fact that I guess this is my calling.

Lyn Wineman:

Your trophy case.

Christie Hinrichs:

Like it or not, right? Cause you know it, not everything is roses when it comes to these kinds of things being my calling. But I truly believe in people and their capacity. I’m a big, big fan of the Gallup strengths. That’s how I lead my team. We have all done it. I know all of their strengths. I don’t believe that you should try to make someone get better at something that they’re never going to get better at, which makes them miserable, and we’re not served well. So, I’m always looking for potential.

Lyn Wineman:

In people?

Christie Hinrichs:

Yeah, and then helping them grow it. That’s very rewarding for me. So again, that’s my team members, that’s community members, that I’ve been blessed to mentor and asked to mentor. I love that, but it’s also then seniors.

Christie Hinrichs:

I guess I did take a year off in the midst of my career. Which was a nice pause to just stop and say, where have I been? If I were to choose where I’m going, which frankly I have to just bring my faith into this conversation. Because what I would say to you is I’ve not done anything by intention as it relates to career. Certainly being a CEO is never on my… I want to be this.

Christie Hinrichs:

So, God’s always taken me to the next place. I argue with Him a lot, because I am a control freak. But my year off was… I did do a lot of reflection and prayer. It was probably ultimately at that moment where I had to say to myself, okay, I hear you God. I think you are calling me to lead. So if I lead, I want to… I ultimately want to inspire others to make a difference through faith and love. So that’s what I set out to do. I don’t do it great all the time, but I’m committed to making sure that those that I have the opportunity to be around in some way, feel both inspired and trusting in the way that I’m leading. I trust God is leading me in the right way.

Lyn Wineman:

That’s amazing.

Lyn Wineman:

Christie, if it makes any difference, I’m feeling inspired right now. I think what you just said, there’s a lot of power in taking pauses and reflecting. There’s a lot of power in connecting with your spirituality.

Lyn Wineman:

There’s also a lot of power in having and expressing belief in others, right? You never know when you might be the one that gives the next Christie Hinrichs the belief to take a step forward and do the kinds of things you do. So Christie, to kind of take that to the next step. What advice do you have for others who are looking to make a difference?

Christie Hinrichs:

I think pay attention to what other people see in you. I think pay attention to your good days and your bad days. What did you do during the day where you go home at night and you’re just exhilarating and you stop. You’re like, I made a difference today, right? Do that. Then pay attention to your bad days and be like, what did I do today? Do less of that. Right?

Lyn Wineman:

Such great advice.

Christie Hinrichs:

So I think, the two main things are listen to others, because outsiders see you in a way that sometimes you don’t see yourself or you don’t allow yourself to see. Then just pay attention to your best days. If you go home and you say to your spouse, I know I made a difference today, then stay on that path.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah. You know what? A lot of people don’t know this. The next question I’m going to ask you, I ask on every podcast. It actually was inspired by you Christie, because you and I have had a chance to work together over the past decade. You always had these great inspirational sayings and some of them were your own. Some of them were words from others.

Lyn Wineman:

But one thing I’ve learned from getting to talk with leaders and passionate people, they have a lot of wise things to say. So I’m going to ask you my question that I love. Christie, could you give us a few of your own words of wisdom?

Christie Hinrichs:

So it’s funny that you say that. Through my career, I’ve had two things happen, one, people have said we need to write a book of Christie isms-

Lyn Wineman:

Yes.

Christie Hinrichs:

And two, people say, shoot, I wish I would’ve recorded you when you said that, so I have the words.

Christie Hinrichs:

One of the things that, I guess this really relates to particularly my team members as we… One of our core values is courage. When the going gets tough, what I’ve always said to them, because this is true, is do the right thing for the right reason. You will always, always, always get the right outcome. I will tell you, Lyn, that has never failed me or my team members. So sometimes it’s just those simple words that bolster you to take a step that feels so hard. But if you can get past that step, it’s life-changing for so many people. Particularly as leaders, we have a responsibility to do that, make the hard decisions. Then probably the other word of wisdom is again, just be intentional about living joyfully, and be grateful for aging. I don’t know how else to leave you other than to say, if you don’t intentionally set out to do that, then growing older is hard. We naturally complain about growing older.

Lyn Wineman:

Some of that’s legit.

Lyn Wineman:

I still do too, but I will say to you, I tell my husband and the people that I love, I want to grow old. I want to be able to contribute on the face of this earth for a long time.

Christie Hinrichs:

You have to have an attitude of a desire to do that, and then be intentional about continuing to find ways you contribute.

Lyn Wineman:

Fantastic. You’ve given us bonus, two for one, and I appreciate that greatly. So Christie, for our listeners, people who’ve been listening to your story, all the great work. How can they find out more about Tabitha and maybe even support you with donations or volunteerisms, or maybe support you by looking for a new job in the wonderful field of healthcare?

Christie Hinrichs:

Just reach out to Tabitha, take a look at our website, make a phone call. When we get through this COVID, stop by. There has to be someone you know that’s had a relationship with Tabitha. Ask them why, ask them to connect you to us. Be curious, even if there is no plan, when you reach out to us. Just be curious to learn more. If it is about volunteering, if it is about contributing financially, if it is about working for us, I will tell you one of my greatest passions is ensuring that we have a culture where our team members truly love coming to work every day. I will also tell you that while we are imperfect, because we are people caring for people, those team members that work at Tabitha, report the highest, highest levels of engagement and happiness compared to anyone nationally.

Lyn Wineman:

That’s amazing.

Christie Hinrichs:

So join us. Not every day is perfect, but join us. Because most days should be filled with just going home at the end of the day and saying, I love what I do and I love where I do it. If I might just share one little story-

Lyn Wineman:

Absolutely.

Christie Hinrichs:

As we… As you know, we’ve just made an announcement that we’re mandating being vaccinated at Tabitha. We have a responsibility to do that. We are caring for the most vulnerable. So hard decision, but again, do the right thing for the right reason. You always get the right outcome. But one team member who had not been vaccinated when he was approached about we’re mandating it. He said, I am in my dream job at my dream place, so I will get vaccinated. So join us, come be at your dream place, doing your dream job. We would just… Whether it’s working for, or if you’re volunteering, we want you to… We believe we can provide an environment that, even if you share your financial gifts, you will feel so much joy in being in relationship with us.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh, that’s lovely. Christie, as we wrap up our time together today, this is going to be hard because you’ve shared so many great things. But what is the most important thing that you’d like our listeners to remember about the work that you are doing at Tabitha?

Christie Hinrichs:

The most important thing I like the listeners to know is that people don’t know us and enough about us and how long and how much we have contributed to the communities in the state of Nebraska. So we need more champions. We want to be understood, not misunderstood. Because advocating for seniors and helping people to learn why to embrace living joyfully and aging gratefully matters, takes an army. Takes an army. So join us, be a part of our army. I can’t tell you how fulfilling it will be for you. Tabitha is such a long held, reputable, contributing member of our community. That the pride that you can have by being a part of the work and spreading the word of the work that we do, it’s a win-win for everyone. So I don’t know if that answered your question, but it’s what I would say.

Lyn Wineman:

It does, 100%, and Christie, I hope that by putting this podcast out into the world, that we’re introducing new people to Tabitha and to Tabitha’s story and the great work that you’re doing.

Lyn Wineman:

We’ve known each other for a while. I fully believe the world needs more people like you. So thank you so much for taking the time to share with us today.

Christie Hinrichs:

Thank you so much. It’s a joy. It’s a joy to be with you. Our journey is one of great pride and excitement that I love as well, so great to be together. Thank you for this opportunity. And yeah, I hope it makes a difference.

Lyn Wineman:

Thanks, Christie. And thanks, everyone.

Announcer:

We hope you enjoyed today’s Agency for Change podcast. To hear all our interviews with those who are making a positive change in our communities, or to nominate a change maker you’d love to hear from, visit KidGlov.com @ k-i-d-g-l-o-v.com to get in touch. As always, if you like what you’ve heard today, be sure to rate, review, subscribe, and share. Thanks for listening and we’ll see you next time.

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