September 6, 2022

Meagan Liesveld

Meagan Liesveld:

You have to find your corner of the world, and you have to go at it with passion. 

Announcer:

Welcome to Agency for Change, a podcast from KidGlov that brings you the stories of changemakers who are actively working to improve our communities. In every episode, we’ll meet with people who are making a lasting impact in the places we call home.

Lyn Wineman:

If you ever wanted to help people and be a part of something bigger than yourself, today’s episode might have just what you’re looking for. It’s an organization with over 1,100 chapters, across 37 countries worldwide. It commands a volunteer force of 1.5 million people. And it raises nearly $6 billion, and that’s billion with a B, every single year. And what’s more, you’ve probably given to this organization at your office through a workplace giving campaign. I am talking of course about the United Way, whose Lincoln and Lancaster County local chapter in Nebraska is doing some great work, including assisting families from Afghanistan, Ukraine and elsewhere on the globe to find new homes in their community. And you’ll hear about it on today’s show, and you’ll find out exactly what you can do, because I know you want to get involved to help them reach their next goal.

Lyn Wineman:

Hey everyone, this is Lyn Wineman, president and chief strategist at KidGlov. Welcome to another episode of Agency for Change podcast. Today’s guest is Meagan Liesveld, executive director at United Way of Lincoln and Lancaster County, which works to improve lives by mobilizing the caring power of this community. Meagan, welcome to the podcast.

Meagan Liesveld:

Thank you, Lyn. It’s so nice to be here with you.

Lyn Wineman:

I always love talking with you, Meagan. And I am hoping you could just start us out by helping our listeners understand what it is the United Way of Lincoln and Lancaster County does and who you help?

Meagan Liesveld:

Oh, I love that question. And I’m going to answer that in a more technical capacity in a minute. But first of all, I just want to say, I think I have been connected to the United Way of Lincoln and Lancaster County for a number of years in a variety of capacities. And one thing has always held true, and that is my belief that the role of United Way of Lincoln and Lancaster County is to connect people, which I love. It is what has always been a draw for me and continues to be a draw for me. We are connectors, and that at my very core is one of the things that I’m most passionate about. And so from more of a big picture sort of philosophical place, that’s really what we do. But on a more technical level, really what we do is we’re an organization that focuses on a few really critical issues. Those are education, financial stability and health.

Meagan Liesveld:

And we do that because we really, as an organization are passionate about ensuring that every person in our community, Lincoln and Lancaster County, has the opportunity to thrive. And we really see those particular areas, those sort of building blocks of a good life, financial stability, quality education and good health as being the major contributors. And so those are the areas that we focus on. And we spend our time working within the nonprofit community with agencies, agency partners that are doing incredible work in that space. And we get to know them. We get to know the programs. We get to know the ways that they’re supporting people. And then we get to go to our community and we talk about that, and we generate support for it. The connections that we’re working to make are between the members of our community, who are also passionate about that cause and say, here’s an opportunity to really step in and be a part of helping other people in our community.

Meagan Liesveld:

Maybe people you know, maybe people you don’t know. Maybe individuals who are experiencing things that you have a tremendous awareness of, maybe you don’t. But we get to bring awareness to some of the needs in our community, and then we get to give people an opportunity to be a part of meeting those needs. And so that’s how we work to connect.

Lyn Wineman:

Meagan, I can just hear the excitement, and the passion and the care in your voice for the work that you are doing. And you and I have actually been connected for a long time, because we live in this community, and you have some marketing in your background, and I of course am very passionate about marketing as well. But I’d love to hear about your career path. How did you use your previous experience to get into this role where you are, and serving very well and very happily today?

Meagan Liesveld:

Yeah. I have had a really fun career path. I’ve been really fortunate to have had the career path that I have, because throughout my career, I’ve always done things that I’m really passionate about and focused on.

Lyn Wineman:

Good for you.

Meagan Liesveld:

Yeah. I feel so fortunate because I’ve done things that I love. I’ve almost all of my career in nonprofit. Very short stint, I mean not in nonprofit, but very short. I knew right away that I wanted to be a nonprofit. And part of that stems from a passion that I have just for mission work, of really that compels me, that drives me. That purpose piece for me is really important. I was really fortunate very early on in my career to find my way to a local nonprofit here in town, CEDARS. And they do incredible work and I was there for 15 years. But it was the marketing and communications, a skillset that brought me to Cedars. I said, I think I could have something to contribute here.

Meagan Liesveld:

But the passion piece for me was because they were working with children and families. And my dad was adopted as a kid, and that was always a part of our story where I could really connect to just a real value for the work that people do to make lives better for people. He had such an incredible growing up experience with my grandparents who adopted him. And so I had a passion for that space of work. And so I thought, if I can contribute anything to that experience for others, I want to be able to do that. So I started out in marketing and communications with CEDARS. I worked my way through, I think about five different positions while I was there.

Lyn Wineman:

A lot of nonprofit folks wear a lot of hats. That is what we know. You wear a lot of hats, which also means you learn a lot of things and you expand your skill set in different ways.

Meagan Liesveld:

Yeah. And I was so fortunate, I had great mentor leaders, who when I would say, “hey, can I try this?”, they said, “yes.” What an incredible opportunity to have people who say, when I say, “can I try this?” They said, “sure. Yeah. Why don’t you do that?” And then they supported my ability to do that and to learn in those spaces. And so worked for that organization for 15 years. And when I left, I was serving as the executive vice president. So had an incredible opportunity to learn about all aspects of nonprofit leadership, and everything from marketing communications to development and fundraising, making connections, ultimately worked with programming and those types of things. And just really had an incredible experience that led me to where I’m at right now, which was the ability to come over to an organization where I took what I knew about partnering, fundraising and working the community, and just expanded it to the ability to work with an even broader network of nonprofits.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah. Now you get to work with so many different ones. If I can say this out loud, you’ve come a long way, baby. But actually, Meagan, I just came across a statistic that kind of blew my mind. But when you do the math, it’s obvious, but most of us will spend nearly 100,000 hours working during our lifetime. Doesn’t that sound like a lot?

Meagan Liesveld:

That does. That’s incredible.

Lyn Wineman:

And I wish I could talk to everyone at the beginning of their careers and go, you deserve to work in something, to do something that you love. I’m a firm believer that go after what you love and the money, and the advancement will follow. I mean, I’m sure there’s a few exceptions out there. But really, I can hear this love in your voice, so I think that’s really great. You mentioned something early, actually in the first question, you mentioned that the United Way is really focusing on the three core areas, education, financial stability and health. I’m really curious, how did you decide on those three?

Meagan Liesveld:

That’s a great question. And I’m going to connect it to two things. One is, our local United Way is connected to a broader network of United Ways from all across the nation and the world actually. And we feel very fortunate to be a part of such strong network of like organizations that are doing incredible work in their communities to support the unique and individual needs of their communities. But a number of years ago, United Way really started to focus in on these particular areas. And as a community, we decided to adopt that same model. And I think that there was a lot of incredible discussion around that and connection around that. And really the reason that we focus in those areas are, and I did mention that earlier, is these really are kind of the essential building blocks to being able to have a successful life. And it can’t just be one of them. So it’s not one, it’s not two, it’s all three.

Meagan Liesveld:

And one of the things that we frequently hear when we talk with organizations that have staff who are working in each of these areas is, you can oftentimes see a need presented, and you can go into a family’s home, and you can start to work with that family and you can work to address that need. So perhaps a young person is not showing up consistently at school. There’s an opportunity to have conversation with that family. The amount of times that as you start to sort of peel back the onion, you learn there are some really significant vulnerabilities in this family that are contributing to this. So it may be what presented to us is the student perhaps is unengaged, or uninterested, or any number of reasons for not attending school. When in reality it’s perhaps the car has been broken for a week, and there’s no ability to pay for it because the parent of the home is not able to afford to do that.

Meagan Liesveld:

Or a student who’s consistently not showing up because they’re staying home to care for a younger sibling so that a parent can turn around and go to their job. And so we think it’s pretty imperative that we be working across all of those areas and supporting all of those areas, because we know how very interconnected they are. And vulnerability in any one of those areas can really cause some pretty significant concerns in others. We saw that a lot during the pandemic. So the pandemic was a health crisis initially, which became an economic crisis, which became an educational crisis, because all of those things are so terribly interconnected. And so we felt it was really important organizationally to ensure that in order for us to have a really strong safety net for our community, that we be focusing on all of those areas.

Lyn Wineman:

That sounds like a really, really smart strategy. Meagan, when I think about the United Way, it’s got to be globally one of the top, most well-known non-profit brands in the world, but yet I bet there’s a lot of misperceptions. Maybe people don’t really understand what it is that you do or how you work. But I’m just curious, we often like to give people the opportunity, hey, is there anything out there maybe that you want to clear up or help people understand better? What would you say that would be for the United Way?

Meagan Liesveld:

You do hear that sometimes. And when you work with a very large and well-known global brand, there are just incredible benefits to that. But then there is confusion at times. So I think the one thing that I would pinpoint, and I think this is really important, so United Way, our local United Way here in our community is in fact a completely independent, independently governed 501c3. So every United Way across the nation has its own separate and distinct 501c3. So even though we have the benefit of being a part of a larger mission and organization, all of our control happens here locally. So we have our own board of directors. We make all of our own independent decision making. All of our decision making here is independent about how we fundraise, what we fundraise for. It’s very specific to our community. And then how we make those funding decisions and how those dollars go back out into the community or are invested. All of that happens at a local level. And so it really is about Lincoln and Lancaster County.

Lyn Wineman:

Wow. That’s great. So I’m curious, with this network, have you seen anything, what are the things about Lincoln and Lancaster County that are similar to other communities? And then are there things that make us different?

Meagan Liesveld:

Oh yeah. So I’m going to start with what I think is similar. And some of this is probably not going to surprise you, because we work in the area of human need. And so at its very core, financial stability education and health, there are elements of need that stretch across our entire nation. But I would say when I talk to colleagues from across the country, or even across the state, a lot of the similarities, and I would say right now, a lot of the similarities, the issues facing most of our communities right now that we would share, workforce is a huge, huge issue.

Lyn Wineman:

Huge, huge.

Meagan Liesveld:

And of course that has really significant impact on people’s ability to be financially stable. Workforce is a major issue. And in a slightly different track on that, it’s a big issue for our nonprofits right now.

Lyn Wineman:

Yes. They’re having trouble attracting people to help them serve the people that they help. Yes, it’s huge, because often nonprofits cannot pay the same salaries as perhaps for-profits with similar positions. That does happen.

Meagan Liesveld:

Right. Right. And then that impacts their ability to serve their community. They endeavor to do it regardless. But that is an issue that we’re seeing. A lack of mental health support coming out of the pandemic is a pretty consistent conversation that we have, not just here in our community, but in other communities, and certainly within our state. A couple of things that are, I think a little bit more specific to our community, because I think we have such an incredible community, we have such a supportive community-

Lyn Wineman:

I’m going to agree with that one.

Meagan Liesveld:

But we have some issues that we need to continue to work on. And one of those is, and we saw this a lot in the last probably six to eight months in particular within our organization is transportation. Our community is heavily reliant on personal vehicles. Particularly we saw this when we had the opportunity to welcome a pretty sizable refugee group into our community in the last year, and those individuals did not have the opportunity to obtain a driver’s license immediately. Not all of them did. Certainly it was impossible to buy a car for quite some time.

Lyn Wineman:

It was. Right.

Meagan Liesveld:

So getting to job, getting to appointments, those types of things. Transportation has been a really common conversation. And I think that that will continue to be a conversation, because we want people to be able to be self-sufficient. And so there are those unique things that I think are specific to our community. We have room to grow and room to improve, but certainly we have a community that is focused on solutioning. And I appreciate that about Lincoln and Lancaster County.

Lyn Wineman:

You know what? I’ve never heard anyone use the word solution like that, solutioning. I like that, solutioning. That’s going to be one of my new favorite vocabulary words, Meagan. So you have experience obviously on the nonprofit side. I mean, United Way is also a nonprofit, but in a different way. I’d love to hear a bit more about what opportunities the United Way has to work with these other nonprofit organizations. Obviously you’re distributing money, but does it go beyond that?

Meagan Liesveld:

Yes, it does. And we feel really fortunate that it goes beyond that. One of the things about distributing money is just through the process of distribution of funds. We have an incredible opportunity to regularly connect with nonprofit agencies across the community. We have an incredible opportunity to hear the stories of success, to hear what’s needed, how they want to grow, what they see into the future. If you want to know what the future of Lincoln can look like, go sit down and have coffee with a visionary leader of a nonprofit, because they can always see what’s needed and what the next solution is. And I love that. So we have those opportunities a lot of the time. We also work with just a broader group of community members in public, the public sector. So it’s our nonprofits, it’s the public sector.

Meagan Liesveld:

And I have to say, one of the things that, and I feel like a little bit of a broken record here, but one of the things that I so appreciate about this community is it partners together really, really well. So want a model for great public private partnerships, look at Lincoln. We just do that so well. And so beyond just the 41 agencies that we’re funding this year, when there’s an issue in our community, you will always find opportunity at a table in this community to have a conversation about an issue, because people come together really well to have conversations, to think about solutions and to bring their individual strengths and resources to the table. And I think that’s really a value. And we’re always grateful to be a part of those kinds of conversations

Lyn Wineman:

Meagan, as I hear you talk, every time you talk about connecting and serving, I just hear a little extra sparkle in your voice. If a voice can sparkle. I can just hear it. I’m curious, are there people, or organizations, or books, or art or something that maybe inspired your approach to working with the community? What guided you and how did it help?

Meagan Liesveld:

That probably started pretty early for me, actually. I grew up in a pretty small community in Iowa, which don’t throw anything at me.

Lyn Wineman:

I love Iowa. Iowa is fantastic. Our neighbor, I think Iowa’s fantastic. Nothing against Iowa.

Meagan Liesveld:

Yeah. Yeah. I do too. I do too. But I grew up in a pretty small community. And I had two parents who were incredibly involved, they grew up in that community. And they were involved in really different ways. My dad had a pretty obvious leadership role in a company in the community. My mom is a more behind the scenes kind of person. But I watched during all of my growing up years the two of them always say “yes.” When it was inconvenient, they said “yes.”

Lyn Wineman:

It’s often inconvenient when you get the ask, especially if you’re raising a family.

Meagan Liesveld:

Yeah. Yeah. But they did. And they did it because they genuinely cared about the people around them. They saw the community as their community, and they took a lot of pride and ownership in that. I think very early on, I saw the value for viewing your community as the broad community. And the challenges, but also the real joy of saying “yes,” even when it’s inconvenient. Because it’s really a service to your community as a whole, in addition to that person that you’re saying yes to. And so I just was really fortunate to have incredible models of service in my life very close. I would say the same with my grandparents.

Meagan Liesveld:

And then coming to the Lincoln community, if there’s not a community that fosters the idea of servant leadership, then I don’t know one that does. And being in the nonprofit community, I was inspired by incredible leaders. And we have incredible, incredible nonprofit mentor leaders, for-profit mentor leaders in this community. But I also got the opportunity to see people who just showed up every day and worked hard to support people, people in the front lines, who whether you were having a good day or a bad day, didn’t matter. You showed up for somebody else. So it’s really inspiring to be around people like that. That certainly I think has been a driver for me.

Lyn Wineman:

Meagan, I think that’s just a great testament too, to any of us, whether we’re parents, grandparents, or we just have kids around us, they’re watching. You watched your parents, you watched your grandparents, you watched the people in the community. And I think that there’s a lot of opportunity to inspire others. I also think back to over the past, my life, the times that I’ve said “yes,” and volunteered and gone in, even when it wasn’t convenient, I always feel like I take away more than I give. I’ve met new people. I’ve learned a new skill. I’ve learned a new issue. I’ve kind of filled my heart with the satisfaction of knowing I’m making my community or a community a better place. And so I do think there’s a bit of that giving and receiving that happens both ways.

Meagan Liesveld:

Absolutely. Absolutely there is. I feel that same way. I often come away with a whole lot more than I suspect I was able to give.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. For sure.

Meagan Liesveld:

You can feel a little guilty for that sometimes.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh, no, no, no. I don’t think you should at all. I don’t think you should at all. I think it’s just a good reminder for the days when you’re like, I don’t know. I’m tired today. It’s a good reminder that in the future, you’ll be happy about this. So lately I’ve been reading a lot in the paper about something called the Resettlement Fund. Can you talk to us a bit more about this work?

Meagan Liesveld:

I would love to. This has been a really incredible journey that we’ve been on to create the Lincoln Resettlement Fund. It’s about connecting.

Lyn Wineman:

Whoa, surprise.

Meagan Liesveld:

Surprise, surprise, right? But it’s been, gosh, it was a number of months ago. It was in the spring. We started to have some pretty substantive conversation with a number of nonprofits across our community. We were just starting to hear some conversations bubble up about how our new neighbors were doing in the community and how we were doing as a community, welcoming a pretty sizable number of refugees who came in into our community in the last six months. And we have been, as you probably know, an incredible resettlement community for a long, long time. So this is work that we cherish, and enjoy and embrace as a community, and have a lot of resources for. But one of the things that was really unique about this point in time in this last year is that we welcomed an incredibly sizable, as I said, group of individuals coming all at once into our community on the heels of virtually no resettlement activity in the year prior.

Lyn Wineman:

Right. It was quiet. It was quiet. And then all of a sudden, big things happened.

Meagan Liesveld:

Big things happened. Yeah. And so because of kind of that quiet time and then a sort of big things happening with a great group of Afghan refugees and Ukrainian refugees coming into our community, we started to hear that there was some work that maybe we could do, that needed to be done to have our community help support those individuals and those families a little bit better. And so we pulled together, just a group of community members connected from all different areas of the community, from Lincoln Public Schools, from Ukrainian churches here in the community, government, funders, our great cultural centers, certainly our refugee resettlement organizations. And we had a conversation and we said, “how can our community help? What can we do to support your efforts and ensuring that every refugee, or immigrant, or new person into our community from these communities feels welcome and has access to the resources that they need?”

Meagan Liesveld:

And so we had a great community conversation and refined this. And from that, we worked with a number of organizations from across the community who gave really generously to start a Lincoln Resettlement Fund. And we’ve been so grateful to see grow. We raised, I think to-date a little over $325,000 of new money into our community.

Lyn Wineman:

Congratulations. That is really great. What a great initiative and a great result so far. I know it’s still going.

Meagan Liesveld:

It’s still going. We’re still fundraising. But we have actually already been able to put those dollars back out into the community. We quickly turned those back around. They’re being invested into the community to support some specific areas that that group was able to identify that philanthropy could really play a role. Transportation needs, with some situational childcare and with some expanded case management, those were the things they said, if we could just have a little bit more resources there today, that’ll make a long-term impact on our ability to support. So that’s been an incredible opportunity for our community to connect and be a part of welcoming our new community members.

Lyn Wineman:

Congratulations, once again, on that. I think that’s really great and I’ve been reading some great things about it. So I’m glad you could share a little bit more. So one more thing I’m really curious about, any fundraisers, events, fun things on the horizon that we should keep our eyes out for?

Meagan Liesveld:

Absolutely. So we’ve talked a little bit just about United Way is we do fundraising. That is a part of our makeup. Every year we do what we call the Annual Campaign. That is really the primary period of time when we’re really just out in the community and we’re talking about the great work of our nonprofits. We’re helping people understand the needs that exist in our community and we’re raising dollars that will then later be distributed back out into those agencies. And we are having our kickoff to our Annual Campaign on September 8.

Lyn Wineman:

Ooh. All right.

Meagan Liesveld:

Yeah. So we’re doing some fundraising now. We call this our pace setter. So this is our sort of lead group that we work with of workplaces that are fundraising now. But the official campaign kickoff happens September 8. We’re really excited about it. We have incredible chairs for our campaign this year. Chancellor Ronnie Green and Jane Green are chairing our campaign.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh, yeah. That’s great.

Meagan Liesveld:

We are hosting our kickoff at Devaney on September 8. And Trev Alberts is going to be our keynote. So we’re pretty excited to bring the giving opportunities to the community. And then we always follow our kickoff with a day of volunteerism. And so we have our day of caring the following day, where we will have individuals spread out all across this community, in those 41 different agencies that we support donating their time and their energy to do something that the nonprofit now don’t have to do themselves and don’t have to dedicate their staff time too, because we show up and we try to take care of those things. So those are a couple of really fun things that we have coming up.

Lyn Wineman:

That sounds great. So watch the calendar in September then. All right. Fantastic. So if there was one big goal you could accomplish during your time at the United Way, Meagan, what would that be? It doesn’t have to do with connecting people.

Meagan Liesveld:

You read my mind. This is interesting for me, because I have to say there’s always a temptation to have something that you can measure, a metric. One big, an initiative of something.

Lyn Wineman:

That’s your marketing background, right? What are we going? What’s the goal? What’s the goal?

Meagan Liesveld:

What is the goal? So to have it be connection-

Lyn Wineman:

That’s all right.

Meagan Liesveld:

Is a little, it’s like, gosh, it’s got to be something a little bit more measurable or something like that. But the more I’ve sat in my role, I’ve gotten a lot more comfortable with that being the goal. If I remove myself from this chair, from this kind of United Way connection bubble, and I look out at our community out at our world, connection’s really needed.

Lyn Wineman:

Yes, it is. Now more than ever, I think. After being distanced. Distanced, afraid, paused. Connection is really important for so many reasons.

Meagan Liesveld:

Yeah, it really is. So if nothing else, if we accomplish nothing else, continuing to be able to connect people at a time when connection has been challenged by distance, I think it’s challenged by rhetoric, I think it’s challenged by a lot of things every day. I think that it takes a real intentionality to connect right now, and it has for the last couple of years. So if we are a part of the fabric of helping people stay connected, continue to committing to knowing one another and caring about one another, I think that’ll be enough.

Lyn Wineman:

I think that’s lovely. I think that’s huge, Meagan. I think it’s absolutely huge. All right. I’m going to ask you next my favorite question. Everybody who listens to the podcast knows this is my favorite question, because I like to be inspired. And I have a collection of motivational quotes that I look to. I’m constantly looking up new quotes and putting them in front of me. But I would love an original quote from you to inspire our listeners?

Meagan Liesveld:

No pressure.

Lyn Wineman:

No pressure at all. You’ve said so many inspiring things. I feel like I’ll go back through the transcript when we’re done and I’ll go, oh, but she said this and she said this. What I’ve learned about great leaders is often they say so many inspiring things, but they’re so humble. They’re like, I don’t know. I know you’ve got many great things to say.

Meagan Liesveld:

I think, this is hard for me because of the pressure of it.

Lyn Wineman:

I’m sorry.

Meagan Liesveld:

I’ve been so inspired by so many people who have fed me incredible nuggets of wisdom throughout my career. And I have a little, I’m looking at it right now, I have this little sort of world of quotes over to my side. And the one that I would say, and I don’t know who said it, I don’t know when they said it, so I’ve made it my own over the years.

Lyn Wineman:

I love it. I love it.

Meagan Liesveld:

It’s that I think you have to find your corner of the world and you have to go at it with passion.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh, I’ve never heard anyone say that before. I think that is attributed to you 100%. You have to find your corner of the world and you have to go at it with passion. I love that. That’s so nice. Thank you for that. So how can people find out more about the United Way of Lincoln and Lancaster County?

Meagan Liesveld:

The best way, the easiest way to find out more about United Way of Lincoln Lancaster County is probably through our website at unitedwaylincoln.org.

Lyn Wineman:

Unitedwaylincoln.org. We’ll put that in the show notes too. I often think I should just change that question to, “what’s your website address?”

Meagan Liesveld:

I was going to say, does anybody give a different answer? I love it.

Lyn Wineman:

Sometimes. Sometimes. Unitedwaylincoln.org. That’s great.

Meagan Liesveld:

Or they can call me, but I don’t think we want to put my phone number-

Lyn Wineman:

Oh, yeah. No, let’s not put your phone number there. They can find the phone number on the website. How about that?

Meagan Liesveld:

Indeed.

Lyn Wineman:

So, all right. As we wrap up our time together today, what is the most important thing that you would like our listeners to remember about the work that you’re doing?

Meagan Liesveld:

I think the most important thing is that we don’t do any of this alone. None of it is done in isolation. Everything that we do is very intentionally about partnership. Every aspect of our work is done in partnership. And that is something I would never, ever change. A variety of perspectives is critical. It’s what makes decision making rich. It’s what focuses us, I think, on what matters the most because we stay connected. And I just think that that’s so very important. None of this work is done in isolation. Everything we do is done in partnership.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh, Meagan, that’s lovely. I have really enjoyed talking with you today.

Meagan Liesveld:

Likewise, Lyn.

Lyn Wineman:

Reconnecting with you after a little while. And I’m just going to say, I really think the world needs more people like you and more organizations like the United Way of Lincoln and Lancaster County.

Meagan Liesveld:

Thank you, Lyn.

Lyn Wineman:

Thank you for joining us today.

Meagan Liesveld:

It’s been an absolute pleasure. Thank you for the talk. I’ve really enjoyed it.

Lyn Wineman:

Me too.

Announcer:

We hope you enjoyed today’s Agency for Change podcast. To hear all our interviews with those who are making a positive change in our communities, or to nominate a changemaker you’d love to hear from, visit KidGlov.com at K-I-D-G-L-O-V.com to get in touch. As always, if you like what you’ve heard today, be sure to rate, review, subscribe, and share. Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time.

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