May 18, 2022

Lyn Wineman and Kelley Peterson

Announcer:

Welcome to Agency for Change, a podcast from KidGlov that brings you the stories of changemakers who are actively working to improve our communities. In every episode, we’ll meet with people who are making a lasting impact in the places we call home.

Dan Downs:

If you’re listening in for the first time today, you should know that this isn’t your typical episode of Agency for Change. Today marks a very special episode of the podcast because it’s our centennial show. Over the past 100 episodes, we’ve had the pleasure of bringing you the stories of people creating positive change in the world, through the work they’re doing and how they share their message. To celebrate this milestone, we’re going to do things just a little bit differently today.

Dan Downs:

First things first, if you’re wondering why Lyn’s voice sounds so basey, let me introduce myself, I’m Dan Downs, copywriter at KidGlov and a creative contributor on the podcast. I’m excited to have you join me as I turn the mic on two very special guests, both of whom have put in tireless work introducing you all to changemakers from every industry imaginable, putting a megaphone in front of those who are doing good.

Dan Downs:

You might know them as your beloved hosts of the Agency for Change podcast, Lyn Wineman, president and chief strategist, and Kelley Peterson, vice president and nonprofit creative director at KidGlov. Lyn and Kelley, I’m eager to talk with both of you today and learn more about the great impact you’re making on the world. Well then, we will kick it off with Kelley, we’ll start with you. Let’s say this is someone’s first time hearing about KidGlov, how would you explain the kind of work we do and who we help?

Kelley Peterson:

Well, Dan, this is my favorite story to tell when someone asks me about what’s KidGlov all about, and what do you do? The short answer is we are a full-service boutique marketing, branding and advertising agency. What does that mean? We do everything and not only that, we have five expertise areas and they are nonprofit, healthcare, social impact, financial services and purpose driven business.

Dan Downs:

Very good. We’re going to get a little bit more into the origins of the name and the origins of KidGlov, but we’ll come back to that. But for a minute, I’m going to hop over to Lyn here, because I’m wondering about the time before KidGlov, which I’m affectionately referring to as BKG. Tell me about Wineman Communications, what was the most important thing that experience gave you in terms of the building blocks of KidGlov?

Lyn Wineman:

Dan, it’s just funny to think back to those days, because it was literally just me at my dining room table. I sold some work. I found my favorite friends who were freelancing. They came along with me and that’s how we started. I mean, such humble beginnings. But when I started, I was passionate about two things. I was passionate about the work, and I was passionate about the culture, but since we started and it was just me there, it wasn’t a lot to worry about culture wise, right? I had really great coffee and a nice phone, and that was my culture.

Lyn Wineman:

I think the early days, we did work a lot on the work, but then the greatest thing was we brought in Rachel Nullmeyer as our first employee besides me and she’s still with us today. Then we brought in Kelley Peterson and then it was the three of us and it wasn’t just me. And so, we started thinking about culture and core values, and then Sarah-Jane came in, Sarah-Jane is still with us today, but then it became very obvious that it wasn’t all about me. It just felt wrong to have my name above the door, so to speak. That it also, it just felt like Wineman Communications Group was not a very imaginative name and we are all about imaginative creativity, strategic creativity, and it was just really time for something new.

Dan Downs:

I have to say too, that it’s like you got hooked up with Kelley who now is such a big part of the business, tell me how did that even happen though?

Lyn Wineman:

Well, Kelley was president of the Lincoln chapter of the American Marketing Association. I was lucky enough to be on her board, which was fantastic. Right after, I had started Wineman Communications Group, Kelley and I were at an AMA luncheon meeting, I think it was at Speedway Motors. We were recognizing Speedway Motors and I sat by Kelley and I said, “Hey Kelley, guess what? I think I’m ready to hire a creative director.” And guess what Kelley Peterson said, “I want to be a creative director.

Dan Downs:

How fortuitous.

Lyn Wineman:

It was that moment was like, it was exciting and terrifying at the same time because anybody who has started a business will tell you the most terrifying thing is starting a payroll, right? And becoming responsible for other people’s lives. It’s one thing to be responsible for your own life, but other people’s lives, that’s getting really serious. Yeah, that was great. We went to lunch and coffee a couple times and then made it happen.

Kelley Peterson:

The rest is history.

Dan Downs:

We’re kind of doing a little history of KidGlov 101 class here, which I really love. I’m going to keep that going with this next question for Kelley. In 2013, we officially changed our name to KidGlov, so Kelley, what can you tell me about where the name KidGlov came from? Why was that the right choice for the company?

Kelley Peterson:

Well, this wasn’t an easy task, Dan. I was going to say the best thing that we brought over from Wineman Communications into KidGlov was Lyn Wineman herself. When you change a name of a company, it isn’t a small undertaking, especially if it was a family name. And so, I just am really appreciative to Lyn and her entire family who went on a limb to take on this name that wasn’t the easiest to get behind.

Lyn Wineman:

We had to have a family meeting, a family meeting, and I had to present it all to them, just like we present to clients.

Kelley Peterson:

Absolutely. And so, the name is from it goes all the way back to the 1700s, actually when kid gloves were in fashion at the time so I love that it’s still fashionable today. But in the 1800s, the statement handling something with kid gloves came to play. When I talk to younger generations now, I’ll say, have you ever heard of the phrase handling something with kid gloves? And the further away we get from it, maybe they don’t know, but it was strong. And I love to coattail meaning, especially when it has a historical meaning to it. And so, kid gloves were made out of the finest leather and not just anybody could have a pair. They were elite and they were tailor-made and they didn’t have spandex and zippers and all of these things that they do now. And so, these gloves were tailor-made to fit with buttons.

Kelley Peterson:

And so, if you see our logo and you see that button, it’s because of that made for you only in tailor-made piece, but handling something with KidGlovs means handling it with great care and that’s exactly what we do with brands and who we work with. What I love about this brand is that it evolves, it’s evolved for the last 12 years, and it keeps on evolving. And so, we’ve had people say, is that a colon in there? Yep. Is it a power button? You bet. Is it a pig nose? Sure. Why not? Is it two eyes…

Lyn Wineman:

That is one of the weirder ones, the pig nose. Yes.

Kelley Peterson:

Is it two eyes and a smiley face? Absolutely. When people can see different things within your brand, you’ve done your job. When people say what’s that KidGlov all about, I love to tell the story, if you couldn’t tell.

Dan Downs:

Well, you answered one of my questions, which that I was going to ask as I was thinking while you’re answering, which was that like, what are people’s impression of the name and what are some of the questions you’ve got about where did the name come from? That kind of thing. It sounds like we’ve gotten kind of really all across the board.

Kelley Peterson:

Absolutely. I have a background in working with kids and working with non-profits. And so, first oftentimes people say, oh, the KidGlov in your name has to do with kids because you’ve worked with child caring organizations and I have for a lot of my life, but that actually doesn’t have anything to do with it, but I sure love working with child serving organizations today.

Dan Downs:

You just tell them good guess, but no, but we appreciate the guess. All right. We’re going to keep talking about that time. This question is for both of you, but we’re going to start with Lyn here. What would the old KidGlov that one from 2013 think about the KidGlov from today?

Lyn Wineman:

When I think of the old KidGlov, the original KidGlov, I think of, if I think about what did she look like? It would be Rosie the Riveter, right? She would be proud of us and she would say, “Hey, you’ve come a long way, baby,” right? Like, I mean, when you think about it, I remember the first time I walked into a room and I said to someone, we were in a situation where we were introducing ourselves and telling people what you do and I had left a job and came my turn and I said, “Hey, I’m Lyn Wineman and I’m starting an agency.” And everybody across the table looked at me and kind of was like, “Yeah. Okay.” But we did it right. Like we did it and we formed, and we’ve done great work.

Lyn Wineman:

And we survived the lean years. I mean, Kelley remembers the lean years when we… We always had to be like, one of us has to be strong while the other one is freaking out because there are lean years when you start. But I mean, now we’ve been named agency of the year and we’ve won best in show and tons of awards and we have great people that’s just growing by leaps and bounds and we’ve been at best places to work, we’re a certified B Corp now. I mean, all of those things, the original KidGlov would be really proud of.

Dan Downs:

Yeah. I can see why, but Kelley, what do you think? 

Kelley Peterson:

I have so many of the same things to say, and before this all started, Lyn mentioned that we were both in the AMA and whether it was the AMA or the American Advertising Federation and I was at those award shows and there were these agencies that you would just sit there and hear their name over and over and over again as award winners. And I thought, wow, I wonder what that would feel like, because that was the X agency show. As of late, I’ve been sitting there thinking, wow, I wonder what aspiring other organizations and people who aspire to do great in their profession are, now hearing the name KidGlov and thinking the exact same thing, and how cool is that? I want to be that someday.

Kelley Peterson:

We started out officing, even our locations were inside of someone else’s office. And so, we would’ve never in our wildest dreams imagined that we would have the facilities and offices and the locations that we do today at all and so I think that is incredible. Then not only the awards for our work, but the awards that individuals that work on this team have achieved over that time period as well is just absolutely remarkable, so remarkable work, outstanding leaders within the community, and they’re just thought leaders and there’s no doubt about it.

Dan Downs:

I mean, we were at an award show just the other night and that was my experience is sitting there and just hearing our name come up again and again, and again was sort of surreal for me. I think Lyn knows this too, but a year ago when I joined the team, that award show was the same way and I had just joined the company. I didn’t know, all the things that I know now, but all I knew is that I went to this award show that we just kept winning all of these awards over and over and over again and I really couldn’t believe it.

Kelley Peterson:

It’s another reason to really thank the Lincoln and Omaha communities for having great agencies and great marketers in our midst and gave us something to inspire towards and we’ve done that.

Dan Downs:

Well, we’re going to shift gears for a minute because we’re going to talk about the reason that we’re all here today, which is for the podcast. But I thought we would start with a little trivia and I have a first question for either of you, whoever can answer on what date did our first episode air?

Lyn Wineman:

Wow. I don’t actually remember. I know it was hot outside and I think it was around the time I know we wanted to launch around the time we had a contest called the Agency for Change contest grant, and we were announcing the winners and we wanted the podcast to launch about the same time we were announcing the winners. I know it was hot outside. I know it was in the middle of a pandemic, those things, I remember.

Dan Downs:

Any guesses, Kelley?

Kelley Peterson:

I absolutely remember that first podcast, because it was one of my favorite people, one of my favorite creators out there in this world, and it was with Jen Landis of Pincurl Girls. 

Listen to our first episode here: https://kidglov.com/podcast/jen-landis/ 

Dan Downs:

If I had a little sound effect board, this is where I would insert like a little bell for you, but you are correct. That was Jen Landis, and we’ll stick a link to that episode here in the show notes so that people can listen. But I am curious since that was the first episode, Lyn, what were you thinking on that first episode? Oh, what were you feeling when you were recording that first one?

Lyn Wineman:

I was absolutely terrified. I mean, honestly, I knew it was a good strategy. I knew we needed to do it. I knew we wanted to do it and I’ve always believed that anything worth doing is worth doing ugly first, right? Like you’re not going to… If you wait until you’re perfect, it’s too late. I was absolutely terrified. Jen had already launched a podcast for her business Pincurl Girls and so she was experienced and she knew what she was doing and she was very patient and really helped us get off to a very, very good start. Yeah, it was a great, still one of my favorite episodes. I mean, Jen is all about empowering people and empowering women. That day, she was empowering me by helping me learn how to do a podcast.

Dan Downs:

Yeah. Well, I listened to it and I thought you did really well.

Lyn Wineman:

Thank you.

Dan Downs:

One hundred episodes later, obviously you’re very refined, both of you guys. There’s a lot more podcasting skills in your repertoire now, but I thought it was great…

Lyn Wineman:

Oh thank you for that.

Dan Downs:

… for a 100 episodes ago. That was pretty good.

Lyn Wineman:

I think it was out in the market for about 90 days before I had the courage to listen to it. I think that when I listened to it, it was better than I thought it would be. I think that also probably is due to the fact that Jen cleaned it up quite a bit.

Dan Downs:

Okay. Okay. All right. Next question here, Kelley, first host of the podcast on January 6, 2021, who did she interview? And for bonus points, what organization was this individual with?

Lyn Wineman:

I do remember that one. I remember Kelley’s first episode being with Mario Racicot and I think I always mispronounce his name so I’m sorry, Mario, if you’re listening. But Mario was with Big Brothers and Big Sisters and Mario had called us and we talked about maybe doing some work for him and it wasn’t going to work out for a number of reasons, but I was like, “Mario, why don’t you be on the podcast instead?” Then Kelley was ready to get started and so Kelley got to tell that story and it was such an emotional story. I mean, Mario just brought so much history to that podcast.

Listen to Mario Racicot’s podcast here: https://kidglov.com/podcast/mario-racicot/ 

Dan Downs:

Yeah. It’s interesting too, poor Mario must have trouble people mispronounce his name, because right at the top of the episode, Kelley and him had a very similar conversation. She’s like, I think this is how I say it, Racicot? Kelley, thinking back on that episode, had you ever hosted a podcast before then?

Kelley Peterson:

I had not hosted a podcast prior to that.

Dan Downs:

Okay. That was your first ever?

Kelley Peterson:

Out on the limb first ever.

Dan Downs:

Okay. At what point do you feel like things really gelled for you in terms of hosting where you felt like you were really comfortable, you had a good rhythm down, all that stuff?

Kelley Peterson:

I may not have hosted a podcast before in this form, but for many, many years, I have facilitated conversations and groups of people communicating. It’s one of my most favorite things to do so that wasn’t new to me to build harmony and build the conversation and thought-provoking discussions. I had really been attuned to that before I just got on and hit record. Also, from a marketing communications standpoint and what we do at KidGlov, and it’s hard to say that making someone cry is a win.

Kelley Peterson:

But oftentimes, we do, it could be anything from a video or a television commercial that we’re working on all the way down to a very simple, direct mail piece. And the result was touching someone so much that it brought them to tears, you know that you have done your job. And so, the very first podcast, I think, not only was Mario tearing up so was I, because he was, and we were just having such a raw and authentic, genuine discussion that I think it was a win, so much of a win that like, how am I ever going to beat that one on podcast number two?

Dan Downs:

Yeah, you set the bar too high?

Kelley Peterson:

Yeah.

Dan Downs:

Yeah. Okay. Did it take you 90 days to finally decide to listen to your episode like it was for Lyn or no?

Kelley Peterson:

Well, I don’t think so because I wanted to right afterwards see, okay, like automatically, let’s play at least maybe not it’s it in its entirety, but I wanted to see how it went, and mainly that I did truly in fact hit the record button.

Dan Downs:

Yeah, that’s the biggest thing.

Kelley Peterson:

That’s the case.

Dan Downs:

Yes. For no other reason, just wanted to make sure the mic was on and we were going.

Kelley Peterson:

Yes.

Dan Downs:

Okay. That’s a good reason to listen. All right. One last question for you guys here. There’s a very exclusive 100 club of episodes featuring guests who have garnered 100 or more downloads, who are the two guests who have reach this milestone?

Lyn Wineman:

All right. I know the answer because I’m a data geek and so I’m always like, I’m always in the podcast portal at least once a week going like what’s going on in here? It’s fascinating to me because there’s kind of a cadence, people download right away, but then there might be reasons they come back and it’s so it’s fun to watch, but I know for sure I know our 100 club members are Ava Thomas, who at the time was publisher of the Lincoln Journal Star and now has added the Omaha World-Herald to our repertoire.

Listen to Ava Thomas’ podcast here: https://kidglov.com/podcast/ava-thomas/

Lyn Wineman:

And she also told such, such a personal, personal story on our podcast. I was so honored to be able to share her story. It’s just fantastic. Then the other that’s right at a hundred, I think right now is Joel Makovicka. And of course, Joel has this great business Makovicka Physical Therapy that I swear every time you turn the corner, there’s a new location, which is fantastic. We had such a great conversation, but of course, he too, has Husker football fame, which did not hurt the name recognition and the downloads as well.

Listen to Joel Makovicka’s podcast here: https://kidglov.com/podcast/joel-makovicka/ 

Dan Downs:

This is where I’d hit that bell again, because obviously Lyn is correct. We must have just been on a streak in 2021 because both of these aired in 2021. Apparently, we were doing something really right around that time. Well, speaking of popular episodes, we wanted to put something together for guests who are featured in our top five most downloaded episodes. Lyn, would you want to tell us about what that is?

Lyn Wineman:

Sure. I’m really excited about this because I like to try new things, right? And so, one of the things we have always done, every single podcast, we ask our guest for a quote, an original quote, and then we turn that into a graphic and we share that on social media. If you come into our office, you might see some of those quotes on the wall and we’ve been trying to figure out how can we share these back with the guest? Because I always love that moment when a guest says, “Oh, I can’t believe you’re asking me this. I don’t know if I have anything important to say,” but they’ve all said so many important things by that point in the podcast.

Lyn Wineman:

We want to share back with the top five most downloaded episodes. We want to share their podcast graphic, quote graphic. Their original quote in the art form that we put it in as a non-fungible token so as an NFT, so we want to get into that whole new tech world. This seems like a really fun way to share that back with them. Those top episodes need to be looking out. And so, that would include Ava Thomas, it would include Joel Makovicka. It also includes Greg Harris, Sarita Reddy, Sarita Reddy, who was our second episode and then Gerry Dunlap and Justina Roth from Farmers & Merchants Bank, so watch your emails guys.

Dan Downs:

Yes. We’re going to reach out to them soon to let them know. The good news is everyone is a winner today, guys.

Lyn Wineman:

Everyone’s a winner.

Dan Downs:

Yes. Now, I want you to just reach onto the table and grab your metaphorical crystal balls here, because we’re going to talk about the future for just a moment. Imagine if you will, it’s five to 10 years down the road, what do you see for the podcast? What do you see for KidGlov as a whole? And Kelley, we’ll start with you.

Kelley Peterson:

All right. Well, we’ll see how well my crystal ball is working today.

Dan Downs:

Just a little shining up.

Kelley Peterson:

But one episode that I remember doing it was with Mike Adams from Purple and he’s based in the UK. And so, I would say a goal would be to do more international and then, hey, we’ve already done that. I love planning goals that I’ve already accomplished. No.

 

Listen to Mike Adam’s episode here: https://kidglov.com/podcast/mike-adams/ 

Dan Downs:

All right, seems more so attainable.

Kelley Peterson:

I do think that just speaks to broadening our audience. I don’t necessarily know international that though, that’s cool, but I know that we want to definitely branch out and do more nationwide if not beyond that work for KidGlov as well as podcast guests. I think that our footprint is going to expand considerably in the next five to 10 years. I am going to give this list of things that I’ve learned here in a bit so I don’t want to give that away. But I personally, in the next five to 10 years, I want to keep on learning about things that I didn’t even know about and keep that open mind.

Kelley Peterson:

What I didn’t get to say in answering the first question about what KidGlov does is that we are helping people who are changing the world and we don’t even know what we’re going to change yet. In the next five to 10 years, we’re just going to keep on doing it and do it some more. What we do is help people, whether it’s through this podcast or through our full service, range of services is just help them shout from the rooftops of how they are matchlessly doing what they are doing to change the world differently than anyone else, and we’re going to keep on doing that.

Dan Downs:

What I’m hearing is there are lots more episodes coming.

Kelley Peterson:

There are lots more episodes coming. I’ve got…

Dan Downs:

That’s good.

Kelley Peterson:

I can’t even compete when it comes to Lyn Wineman, but maybe there might be a little bit of competition. I don’t know how I’m going to catch up with her 80 to my 20, but I’m going to get there. I’m going to get there.

Dan Downs:

Okay. You’re going to catch up with Lyn. Okay. Lyn, what about you five to 10 years down the road?

Lyn Wineman:

This is not a very good conversation if I just say ditto, right?

Dan Downs:

Same.

Lyn Wineman:

But I feel that way. I mean, I think that the future of KidGlov and the future of the Agency for Change podcast are somewhat intertwined in that. Really, I do see both expanding nationally, right? That started to happen. It’s one of the things that I think the pandemic has maybe encouraged or made happen faster because people are used to working remotely with people across the country and that has really opened doors for both KidGlov and the podcast. This passion to change the world is a real passion to make the world a better place.

Lyn Wineman:

That’s what I love about the podcast. I love talking with people who are passionately doing something to make a difference. It just demonstrates the best of humanity, right? Then, when I think about how do we do that at KidGlov? I mean, one of the things I’m most excited about at KidGlov is this project we have called Creative Nirvana, right? It’s a project that at its core is about making our culture and environment, the very, very, very, very best place to do our work. And not just for creatives, but the whole team, the account service team, everybody has a part in it. I’m excited about changing our piece of the world in that way as well.

Dan Downs:

Yeah. And more NFTs as well.

Lyn Wineman:

More NFTs.

Dan Downs:

Maybe that’s on my list.

Lyn Wineman:

I want to rule the world of podcast, quote NFTs.

Dan Downs:

Yes. Exactly.

Lyn Wineman:

There we go.

Dan Downs:

Okay. Thinking about then, all the episodes that you guys have hosted, all the people that you’ve talked to, and I don’t want to give away any spoilers, but upcoming episodes, are there guests that either of you are really looking forward to speaking with and why are you looking forward to talking with that person?

Lyn Wineman:

I mean, how do you even pick? I’m so glad you didn’t look backwards and have us pick backwards either. Because I think for me and Nicole Todd, anybody who’s been on the podcast knows Nicole Todd helps us with scheduling and making things happen. But whenever I send the audio files to Nicole to send on for editing, I almost always type in, I think this is my new favorite. I think this is my new favorite. I like love them all, but I do have, we’ve recorded a couple that are coming out in the next few weeks after this.

Lyn Wineman:

There’s one with Bob Ravenscroft and Rich Lloyd from Bryan Health. On that podcast and now on this podcast, I announce that I’m going to be a grandmother because my grandson will be born at their hospital just as my kids were, and I was, and my mother was, so that’s kind of fun to connect with that four-generation story. But I mean, I could list every single one that’s coming up and tell you, I was excited about those two because they’re just very different stories as well. But I won’t because this is not supposed to be that long, isn’t it?

Dan Downs:

Yeah. Well, maybe in the five to 10 years question, your answer should open up the KidGlov daycare.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah. That would be very exciting. I’d love to start working on that project of opening up daycare, I mean…

Dan Downs:

Be the best brand-new daycare in the whole city.

Lyn Wineman:

Right. We know through our work that through our early childhood development work, we know that high quality early childhood development is hard to find and it’s expensive. And so hey, if we could help alleviate that for our parents with young kids and maybe our grandparents with young grandchildren.

Dan Downs:

Yeah. There we go.

Lyn Wineman:

Which would be me, would be a great project to work on. I love to look forward to the day when we have the resources to do that. I think we will, Dan.

Dan Downs:

All right.

Lyn Wineman:

Let’s set it as a goal now.

Dan Downs:

I’m on board. I’m signed up and I’ll bring my son to the daycare. Let’s talk to you then. Kelley, who are you looking forward to talking with?

Kelley Peterson:

I was looking at this question and thinking, okay, this is a bucket list question of like, okay, out of anyone you could ever talk to what would be a really fun? And because I don’t have any grandkids on the way yet, but those of you that know me when I say who I think would be awesome as a guest, you’ll know why. I think I would like to interview who runs Doug the Pugs Foundation, who does a lot of fundraising for not only animal welfare, but it’s very much tied to child welfare and because of his success, they are able to give back and I think that’s cool. I’d like to talk to Doug himself would be great. He does a lot of audio recordings of his snorts and such, but yeah.

Dan Downs:

Yeah. Well, we’ll throw a link to that in the show notes, why is that so special to you?

Learn more about Doug the Pug Foundation: https://www.dougthepugfoundation.org/ 

Kelley Peterson:

That is special to me because through Instagram account of my own dog named Chubs, @the_daily_chubs, if you were wanting to go on Instagram and see him, but this just silliness that started as complete silliness, I’ve been able to meet people all over the world through this dog and also, do a lot of great things for other people who need support at the time. At the end of every animal is a person and a voice who needs help or wants to spread joy or all of those things. It’s just been a way to do that and plus learn about social media. When you do it personally and have a passion for it, it makes you better professionally at doing all those social channels and what to do, because you can try so many more things when it’s not somebody else’s dime. And so, I like to tool around and play a little bit on there.

Dan Downs:

What do we need to do to get Chubs on the podcast? Let’s put a treat next to the mic or how do we do that?

Kelley Peterson:

I’m going to talk a little bit about that in the lessons learned portion of this.

Dan Downs:

That’s going to be a new blog post coming up, how to get your dog on your podcast? Let’s talk about what’s been rewarding for you guys to host Agency for Change. What has been surprising for you about the experience? We’ll go with you first here, Lyn.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah. I mean the rewarding part is just, I absolutely love it. I mean, I don’t have retirement in my sights in the future, but someday if I were to retire from advertising, I think I just want to be a podcast host. It’s like I still get butterflies before every episode. I still worry, did I hit record, right? I worry about all those things, but we’ve gotten to meet and talk with such interesting people who are doing such interesting things.

Lyn Wineman:

Then, I think that every time I hear some feedback that says, I love that story, that story really inspired me, that story helped me find the answer to a question or resource, I love all of those things and that makes me really, really, really proud of it. Honestly, I think the most surprising thing is that I never imagined people would be pitching themselves to us and I never imagined that we would have to write a policy for like, hey, when people pitch themselves to us, what would make them a good guest and give us guidelines for whether we should say yes or no? I think the first time somebody pitched themselves to us, I was like, we made it. That was really exciting.

Dan Downs:

Yeah. That’s great. Kelley, what about you?

Kelley Peterson:

Oh my gosh, I’m hoping that this can be a two-hour episode because as Lyn was saying, she gets off and then said, I think that’s my most favorite now. I mean, that’s my next favorite. I get off every single time and I think to myself, that conversation changed my life, the trajectory of it. Now, see, I’m going to get emotional. That means this is a good podcast guys, because I’m getting all emotional now, but perishable food waste, what? Amazing. Performing arts, changing the conversation around disability, philanthropy, gather myself here.

Kelley Peterson:

Improving the lives of LGBTQ plus people, empowering people with vision loss, community impact through cabbage burgers, who thought? Using intergenerational transfer of wealth to sustain home places, reducing substance abuse, achieving positive mental health, arts, and humanities. This is the time I should interject in song obviously or poetry to break up my sadness. I mean, financial literacy so important, community inclusion, hospitality, and thinking about that community inclusion is a form of hospitality, is amazing to me and the power of mentorship.

Dan Downs:

I think just hearing you and how emotional you’re getting, talking about these things, I think is really evidence that we are changing the world. We are helping people who are changing the world. It’s nice too, to talk to somebody who’s so passionate about what they do that just talking about it really, really gets them going, so that’s great.

Lyn Wineman:

We’re across the table, but I want to give you a hug, Kelley.

Dan Downs:

Yes, I know, I was like…

Kelley Peterson:

Oh, and by the way, I want to hug the entire state of Nebraska.

Dan Downs:

That’s right.

Lyn Wineman:

Yes, Kelley needs to say that once I want to hug the entire state.

Kelley Peterson:

That my podcast goals are, I just want to hug the whole earth and maybe the whole United States of all the positive change.

Dan Downs:

I like it. I was like, if I run over and hug Kelley right now, you’ll be able to hear that on the mic. Everybody’s audio’s messed up We can’t do that, but afterward, I’m saving one for you.

Kelley Peterson:

Oh right. I’ll take it.

Dan Downs:

All right. Now, that you guys have 100 episodes under your belts, is there anything you wish that you had done differently? What advice do you think you would give to yourself before you recorded those first episodes? And we’ll go with you first, Kelley.

Kelley Peterson:

Okay. Well, I did mention Chubs, make sure, I have Chubs, I have Rocky Road and I have Dot, and these three guys need to be, I put them in podcast time out and podcast time out means they need to be either in the kennel or on the bed or whatever. Because every time somebody comes through the door, there’s a delivery, whatever, I needed to get that buttoned up way before I’m saying, oh, I’m sorry for these animals.

Kelley Peterson:

Lyn has taught me so much, a course just of fun things to do and get people warmed up in conversation. And so, every time I would chat with her, I’m like, okay, how are you doing this? And then I would try that out too. And one of the things she has tried and that works is just getting people to talk about something that isn’t about what they’re going to talk about. And so, whether that’s tell me something great about today or it’s what did you eat for breakfast or those things that get people conversating with each other, and I wish I would’ve known those right from the get-go.

Dan Downs:

Yeah. I bet it’s nice too, that you’re not doing this alone. You have a partner…

Kelley Peterson:

That is the best.

Dan Downs:

… which you can check with.

Kelley Peterson:

That is the best. Yes.

Dan Downs:

And say, hey, what’s your secret to this? And the answer is talking about breakfast.

Kelley Peterson:

Always food, breakfast is always a winner, is always a winner.

Dan Downs:

Yes, and put the dogs away. Okay. What about you, Lyn? What do you think you would’ve done differently?

Lyn Wineman:

I think, we started this during the pandemic, so we weren’t coming into the office. We didn’t have a sound studio, but I think, the thing I had to learn is you can’t do a podcast from just anywhere, right? You have to be a little bit thoughtful about where you’re going to do a podcast from, as we are right now. But I remember once during a pandemic and a blizzard, I had like six people snowed in at my house and I got my new microphone, which was very powerful and it was picking up everything.

Lyn Wineman:

I moved the podcast literally to my closet and the poor guest was looking around at my blouse and slacks and dresses and shoes. But that’s also one I’ll never forget because it was January 6, 2021. That was the capital insurrection. And so, that podcast guest, who is Dave Newell from the Children’s Home Society of Washington. We’ll always email each other on January 6 because of that closet podcast moment. Then I just wish I would’ve been less nervous. Like I wish I could go back and do the first 20 again and I still get nervous before every podcast. I still superstitiously suck on a cough drop before everyone and have these certain things I do, but I wish I’d been less nervous and just really enjoy the conversations because they’re golden conversations.

Dan Downs:

Yeah. That’s your ritual before every episode?

Lyn Wineman:

A podcast, a LaCroix over ice, sometimes I have LaCroix over ice and a cup of tea. Yep, I do all of those things. I jump on 15 minutes early and test everything out. Yep, I do all that stuff.

Dan Downs:

Well, it seems only fair then, Kelley, do you have any podcast rituals?

Kelley Peterson:

Oh my gosh. Kids, I know you’re going, my children who are listening. My saying is, and I believe I got this from my mother as well. We are not known for as the most punctual individuals but we’re good marketers. And so, what I say to that is we’re living our lives to the fullest. What that means is you can be on there at the podcast starts at 1:00, 12:59 is an occasional because I’m usually absorbed in something else. And so, it wouldn’t be the first time that I wasn’t fully set up with a throat lozenge and something to drink and maybe my dogs are running around, but I just want to be respectful of the people’s time that I’m speaking with.

Kelley Peterson:

Yes, living life to the fullest. I think I say that, but a lot of creativity comes when you’re in the shower, in the middle of the night and all of those things. And so, I do want to say hats off to you, Dan, for helping with some of the scripts and the question writing and all three of us make a great partnership in what we’re going to ask and what we can add to those conversations that make them very, very rich. As much as I say, yes, I’m kind of always running, I’m the white rabbit always late, it’s because I’ve been preparing in my mind to have a conversation that’s just going to be amazing, and I dream about it at night.

Lyn Wineman:

Kelley, I’m so glad you added that too, because I think that might be something people don’t realize, you and I get the focus on the podcast, right? But there is a whole team behind the podcast from the scheduling to the scripting, to the proofreading, to the graphics, to the social media, to the website, to the press release. I think everybody at KidGlov kind of touches a part of it and every once in a while, I’ll talk to another podcaster who does everything themselves. They’re like, how do you do it? I’m like, we got a machine going here, right? We got the podcast machine.

Kelley Peterson:

The answer is we wouldn’t be able to.

Lyn Wineman:

Yes, right?

Kelley Peterson:

It’s everyone.

Dan Downs:

Yeah, that’s the real answer.

Lyn Wineman:

Dan is right at the top right, right at the top of that podcast pyramid.

Dan Downs:

I like that. One of the most fun pieces for me, of helping out with the scripts is that I get to just, I have a little Lyn and a little Kelley now in my head, I get to just imagine like, how would they say this? Or how would they phrase this thing? Or just trying to imagine how you guys think about things has been really fun and terrifying at the same time.

Lyn Wineman:

You must have a lot of laughter in your head because I think when Kelley and I are together, there’s usually some laughter.

Kelley Peterson:

Lots of laughter.

Dan Downs:

Yeah. Well, and now that I know your secret pre-podcast rituals, I can incorporate those into I’m like this really helps me get into the mindset. All right. As we’re heading towards the last few questions here, I’m going to ask you a question that we do ask of each of our guests and our regular listeners probably know this. I’d be remiss if I let Kelley and Lyn out of here without asking them. Let’s talk motivational quotes. Could you give us a few of your own words of wisdom for our listeners? Lyn, let’s start with you.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah. How does it feel to have our own questions directed back at us?

Kelley Peterson:

I know.

Lyn Wineman:

It’s funny, right? We started asking this question because we talked to such interesting people who are often very humble, right? And they really do. They say, I don’t know if I have anything to say, and then they say something and it’s just golden, right? My standard quote, which is not the quote for today, but my standard quote that I used on my first episode was marketing with a bad brand is like wearing sweatpants to a job interview, right? Which doesn’t work as well anymore because now that we’re in a virtual world, a lot of people do wear sweatpants to job interviews.

Dan Downs:

I see.

Lyn Wineman:

Here’s my new quote, don’t let the easy road deter from your magnificent journey. I think that about KidGlov, I think that about this podcast, like it would’ve been easy to stay in a corporate job and kind of stay safe and secure. It would’ve been easy not to do a podcast that terrified me to death, right? But doing those things made life so much richer.

Dan Downs:

Yeah. I think the best part about your new quote is that it’s a lot more future proof than the one about sweatpants because who could have foreseen where we are today, where it’s like, yeah, no, wearing your sweatpants to your interview, you’re on video. 

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah. You don’t even need pants at all. I mean, do your own thing from the waist down.

Dan Downs:

Just put the dog away. Okay. All right. Kelley, what do you think?

Kelley Peterson:

All right, well, this comes from the true marketer within me, but here it is, life is one big conversation waiting for the next positive disruption.

Dan Downs:

I like that. I like that. Why do you think that’s your pick? Could you talk to me about that?

Kelley Peterson:

Sure. I just was fortunate enough to do some marketing communication consulting with Nebraska Community Foundation, which is just complicated yet wonderful organization. They’re the ones that I was talking about that intergenerational wealth transfer and about being making hometowns, especially just changing the narrative about rural living and especially in Nebraska. But we talked a lot about how can you be a part of that conversation? How can you even change the narrative when people aren’t having that conversation? Mike Adams of Purple, same thing about disabilities, so how can you… I talk about direct mail all of the time and that you truly only have 20 seconds and maybe less to get from you the mailbox to the big round file cabinet, which is your trash can. We can’t do marketing communications or actually any conversation that we are expecting someone else to act upon without getting them to think about it first.

Kelley Peterson:

That’s where positive disruption comes in. We want to catch them just for those very few seconds so that we have some mindshare that they can think about it and then take an action that is purposeful and intentional to do so. And I’d say, life is a conversation because in marketing communications right now, everything is digital. Even though I talked about my love for direct mail, social media is not going away. It is the hot ticket. I get asked often how do I get better about social media? How can we do this? And the thing about social media is that it’s a social medium and what a social medium means, it’s conversational, it’s having conversations. If you’re doing one sided social media, that’s where you can improve the most. It’s talk to people, engage them in an ongoing conversation about what you think matters and get them in a way that positively disrupts them, so they think about you and your brand. That’s my long answer.

Dan Downs:

That’s a good answer though.

Lyn Wineman:

That’s a great answer. I’m somewhat intimidated by being on this interview with Kelley.

Dan Downs:

I know.

Lyn Wineman:

I have to sit and listen to Kelley all day long.

Dan Downs:

Yes, exactly. I do feel like one of the things that’s really great about this podcast is that, as the audience, you get to be privy to those conversations, so we are taking those life’s conversations and then recording them and getting them out there so that it goes beyond just that one to one and a lot of people get to then take away those same lessons and feel that kind of enrichment, which is I like. That’s fantastic. All right. This next one here is for either one of you, for our listeners who want to learn more about your work, how can they find out more about KidGlov or the Agency for Change podcast?

Lyn Wineman:

Well, here’s another story. You can go to Kidglov.com and most of you know that, that is KidGlov, one word without an E. Kelley, do you want to tell them why it’s one word without an E?

Kelley Peterson:

That’s another one of my favorites, sorry, and this won’t take long.

Dan Downs:

Which this is the two-hour special, Kelley, that’s fine.

Kelley Peterson:

KidGlov with an e.com was already taken as a URL.

Lyn Wineman:

Yeah, the URL availability formed our name, but the podcast is on the website under the what’s new section of the navigation, brand new website, by the way, if you haven’t checked it out at Kidglov.com, I’ll say it again, brand new website, super proud of it. If you scroll to the bottom, there’s featured podcasts and then the whole podcast section, the podcasts are on Apple, Google, Stitcher, probably listening to it on one of those right now. Then, Kelley and I are both pretty available on LinkedIn. If you connect with us and don’t try and overtly sell us anything right out of the gate, we’ll probably respond to your questions.

Dan Downs:

Okay. As is tradition on the podcast, as we wrap up our time together today, what is the most important thing you would like our listeners to remember about the work you were doing?

Kelley Peterson:

Well, we always say, we’d love to lend you a hand. These KidGlovs are made for working.

Lyn Wineman:

That’s just what they’ll do.

Kelley Peterson:

It’s working alongside you, and again, together changing the world, so it’s a better place for all of us.

Lyn Wineman:

Oh, Kelley. That’s amazing. Building right exactly on what Kelley said, I think as marketers, we do have the ability to change the world by using our voice for something good. And that might sound cliche but it’s not, whether you decide to take up issues of sustainability or DE&I, or social justice or human rights, or just even internal communications that make your culture a better, more positive place. Those voices can change the world.

Dan Downs:

Yeah. I think you two have done a fantastic job of bringing those stories to people, so congratulations to you both on 100 episodes. It is a big deal. As we say, I fully believe the world needs more people like the two of you so thank you so much for taking the time to talk with me today, guys.

Kelley Peterson:

Thanks, Dan and Lyn.

Lyn Wineman:

Thanks Dan and Kelley.

Announcer:

We hope you enjoyed today’s Agency for Change podcast. To hear all our interviews with those who are making a positive change in our communities or to nominate a change maker you’d love to hear from, visit Kidglov.com at K-I-D-G-L-O-V.com to get in touch. As always, if you like what you’ve heard today, be sure to rate, review, subscribe, and share. Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time.

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